[Chad_Wesley_Smith]_The_Powerlifting_Program_Desig(z-lib.org).pdf

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Unformatted text preview: FHDGHAM DESIGN L7 FHDGHAM DESIGN L7 HHHHHHHHHHHHHHH Table of Contents Introduction Assessing the Athlete 13 16 17 18 19 2O 23 Overview of the Phases Hypertrophy Strength Peaking Deload Transitional Weeks Bridge Phases 28 29 37 Determining Volume Finding Minimum Effective Volume Finding Maximum Recoverable Volume 40 41 47 Organizing the Week SRA Curves and Their Implications Determining Overloading Frequency 52 53 80 123 Creating the Individual Session 126 127 128 131 155 Organizing the Mesocycle Determining Mesocycle Length Overloading Strategies Undulating Periodization Strategies Selecting and Progressing Weights 160 Phase Potentiation Strategy Putting it all Together 184 Sample Programs Exercise Selection Considerations by Phase Exercise Selection Considerations by Weak Point Spreading Volume Across Exercise Variations Welcome to the Juggernaut Powerlifting Program Design Manual! The objective of this book is to bridge the gap between the Scientific Principles of Strength Training and giving you pre-written pre—written programs or templates, we want to equip you to create programs for yourself and your athletes for a lifelife— time of training. Understanding the practical applications of Specificity, Overload, Fatigue Management, SRA, Variation, and Phase Potentiation is critical and being able to adjust how these athlete's Sex, Age, principles are implemented based on an athlete’s Size, Strength, Experience, and Lifestyle is what separates good programs from great ones. The Juggernaut Powerlifting Program Design Manual has created a systematic approach to athlete assessment helping you make the most informed decisions possible regarding: -—Volume Volume Thresholds -—Training Training Frequency -— Phase Length and Proportion -— Overloading and Fatigue Management Strategies -— Exercise Selection Coaching certainly has artistic and scientific aspects to it, but really many of those ‘artistic’ 'artistic' decisions are products of deeper understanding based upon seeing thousands of difdif— ferent athletes and even more coaching problems and this manual will help accelerate your understanding of those ‘artistic’ ‘artistic' decisions so you can make more sound and scienscien— tific tific decisions decisions about about them. them. ASSESSING THE ATHLETE .. II I Il.-‘.",”/’:£j."fiv'l ‘ I I”;- , WWW/i“ ‘ ' " f x," 3;, ' 1', . E V 7. WWW "I, 1".- ‘i‘lfi‘usg: “"1 .6. '.\'.u-_.. " . ' ‘:%1.1‘-,hl‘_\“li\lim“" , The Scientific Principles of Strength Training will apply to athletes of all types, regardless of gender, age, experience, princi— strength or any other factor, you must satisfy those principles. Since you are reading this book though and undoubtundoubt— edly are a smart, strong, good-looking good—looking and conscientious person, you already know that though and you want to furfur— opti— ther refine your program design skills, so that you are optimizing programs for every athlete. To optimally implement the Scientific Principles you must understand your athlete, understand how different factors affect the application of isn't the Principles and know that what is optimal for one, isn’t optimal for another and what is optimal now for someone, won't still be optimal in the future for them. likely won’t Answer the following questions, these answers will help inform many decisions we make throughout the rest of this book.. book“ Sex: Sex: -Female —Female -Male —Male Bodyweight: -Light, —Light, Female-Under Female—Under 57. Male-Under Male—Under 75kg. -Middle, —Middle, Female-57 Female—57 to 75kg. Male-75 Male—75 to 100kg. 100kg. -Heavy, —Heavy, Female-75 Female—75 to 90kg. Male-100-125kg Male—1004 25kg -Super Male-Over 125kg —Super Heavy, Female-Over Female—Over 90kg. 90kg.Male—Over125kg Height: -Short, —Short, Female-Under Female—Under 160cm. 160cm. Male-Under Male—Under 170cm. 170cm. -Medium, —Medium, Female-160 Female—160 to 167cm. 167cm. Male-170 Male—170 to 182cm. 1826m. -Tall, —Tall, Female-168 Female—168 to 175cm. 175cm. Male-183 Male—183 to 195cm. 195cm. -Very —Very Tall, Female-Over Female—Over 175cm. 175cm. Male-Over Male—Over 195+cm. l95+cm. Strength (Refer To Classification Charts on pages 11 11 & 12) 12) Squat: Squat -Low —Low (Class VI-III) VI—III) -Moderate —Moderate (Class II-I) ||—|) -High —High (Master-Elite) (Master—Elite) —Very High (Intl Elite) -Very Bench: Bench: -Low —Low (Class VI-III) VI—III) -Moderate —Moderate (Class II-I) ||—|) -High —High (Master-Elite) (Master—Elite) —Very High (Intl Elite) -Very Deadlift: Deadfifl: -Low —Low (Class VI-III) VI—III) -Moderate —Moderate (Class II-I) ||—|) —High (Master-Elite) (Master—Elite) -High —Very High (Intl Elite) -Very Experience: -Beginner, —Beginner, Less Than 4 Years of Serious Strength Training -Intermediate, —|ntermediate, 4-8 4—8 Years of Serious Strength Training -Advanced, —Advanced, 8-12 8—1 2 Years of Serious Strength Training -Very —Very Advanced, Over 12 12 Years of Serious Strength Training Age: -19 —1 9 Years Old and Younger -20 —20 to 29 Years Old -30 —30 to 39 Years Old -40 —40 to 49 Years Old -50 —50 Years Old and Older Diet: -Poor, —Poor, Not Getting Sufficient Calories or Intentionally In A Deficit -Average, —Average, Calories Are Equated but Macro Breakdown and Nutrient Timing Isn’t Isn't Accounted For -Good, —Good, Calories Are Equated with Good Macro Balance and Attention to Nutrient Timing Sleep: Sleep: -Poor, —Poor, 5 Hours or Less On Average -Average, —Average, 5 to 7 Hours On Average -Good, —Good, 7 or More Hours On Average Stress Away from Training -High. —High. This could be related to training for other endeavors along with lifting, a manual labor job job or other factors leading to a high-stress high—stress lifestyle. -Medium. —Medium. You may have some other physically demanding hobbies that you participate in 1-2x/week l—2x/week and have a mix of low and high-stress high—stress days in your job/ relationship/etc -Low. job that isn’t —Low. You have a job isn't physically demanding and lifting is your main physical activity. Historical Workload 1. i. 1x/week ix/week frequency per lift with minimal accessory work. 2. 1i to 2x/week frequency per lift with moderate accessory work. 3. 2x/week frequency per lift with significant accessory work. 4. 2 to 3x/week frequency per lift with moderate to significant accessory work. 5. 3x/week or more frequency per lift with moderate to significant accessory work. Historical Historical Recovery Recovery Ability Ability 1. Will often be sore 3 days after training and struggle to 1.Will increase workloads. 2. Will often be sore 2 days after training. 3. Will often be sore 1-2 1—2 days after training and seem to respond to average workloads. 4. Rarely sore more than 11 day after training and am able to increase workloads. 5. Rarely sore more than 11 day after training, respond to high workloads and possibly have a background in endurance sports or CrossFit. These answers will be important throughout the book and we will discuss their implications at length. MEN’S CLASSIFICATION l RajajaLLBavyJ _Baw L 89‘! 133w, LBW, I RamLRatLfiav l .Bfit 90 100 110 125 140 Isa 90 100 {00.0 152.5 #92 :7 831.5 890.0 932.5 4.17.5 437.5 522 5 640.0 090.0 727 5 767 5 620.0 855.0 .112 5 447 5 452 5 590 0 632 5 672 5 705 0 752 5 430.0 527.17 {767.5 5915 GT2}: 700.0 702.5 095.0 462.5 500.0 407.5 435 0 527.5 .100 0 592.5 517.5 360.0 002.5 452.5 327.5 247.5 3.02.5 352.5 310.0 267.5 56 352.5 NU BUD 90.9 9!..‘2 I I I I I Class IV 125 140 362.5 737 5 755 0 315 0 332 5 220.0 230 0 3011.0 3150 Maslar ‘950 2l0.0 272.5 2625 Class I ‘ 72 5 ‘050 2:2 5 2500 Class II 1100 ‘50 u '62 :1 217 b Class III 95.0 ‘325 '425 181.5 56 75 82.5 140+ 13115) ‘1t 'H/ b 740 [I Inl'I Elila 'ZU.U Inl'I Eli“ Elila 975 1025 lluJJll££U IJUUII‘IUUII‘tDJll’JLDJIDIDIIUIJUIIUUU '70.0 Class IV '600 '125 ‘47 5 ‘57 5 222.5 20-3 0 Clile 1‘00 ‘(lllfl ‘32:) '47 5 '51) I) 18‘?) U Class I U/b 1150 'UU.U 'Z§.U '0/ b 67.5 87.5 95.0 <32 5 115.0 ‘ooo 10':- u 11.5 Master Class II Class III 140 U 120.0 Class IV 140* 325.4;297.5 272 5 25.5.0 285 0 297' :7 «32.5 177 5 222.0 2025 ‘37 5 2625 272 5 2-100 252 5 157,5 167 s 21? f: 225.0 1550 ‘300 1-? 5 ‘90 0 ‘65 C‘ ‘97 5 ‘ 72 5 217.5 ‘45 O 150 0 ‘650 1.57.5 3450 Inl‘l Elite 3175 Ellle 2375 Master 2630 2300 'ciai's's i" Class Ii' 197.5 Class III 1?.5 [I Class IV I Elassll 31;: 1311:] wufiu mull/us was I923 2023 2:373 {Luv 2: 1; " Classlll 11:10 1175 1250 1400 15m) mun 1:575 1775 Inn: 1825 1875 HS ClasslV IClass lll 342.5 1050 I 'cié's's i" 'ci "5'51? 537.5 470.0 52.5 ‘20.: OPEN Ellie MGSIEI 277.5 310,21 Class IV Inl‘I Elite GIN 82.5 biai's's i" OPEN 14+ 75' Class II bib 67.5 260.0 157.5 Classlll 125 I 1.10 82.5 512.5 262 5 Masler 110 60 530.3 370.0 Class IV 75* 56 48V :7 OPEN I ‘550 2075 1301) THPS Class II Class III 1'25 ‘575 Class lV 0.0 (21.0 OPEN 100 352 5 762 :2 Class I 9775 lm'l Elite 69! 5 Clll. 5450 6825 717.5 7135.0 322 17 Masher 5800 6100 645 LI 685 o 715 O 7'37!) Class I 5100 5375 567 5 605 c- 6300 6500 4425 Class II 035.0 795.0 4675 495 o 527.5 555 o Claw II Class III MUD 410 u 41.0.0 400.0 495 u Class IV 312 5 100 330 o 125 350 o 140 330 o 140* 395 o ln|'l Elila 285 D 3.02 5 331) c- 350 0 360 n Ellle 265.0 277 s 305.0 320.0 33:1 o Master 231: U 250 'J 210.0 2am 295 0 Class I '1)? 5 270 o 3140 D 25:1 5 PM) I) Class ll 227 5 Class III 197 5 Class IV 190 CI 140+ 240 U Inl'I Elile 9?? 5 Elila 200 0 Ma sler 1313' D Class! 14.00 Iclasé ll Class III 1:150 Class IV lm'l Ellle 320.c292 E: 29] b EIila 270 C‘ 272 5 Mil SIB? 242 5 2450 Class I 212.5 21I.b “85.0 Class IV 97 5 '35!) 1575 “.52 5 ‘65!) WOMEN’S CLASSIFICATION Raw Raw Raw Raw Raw Raw Raw Raw Raw Raw 44 43 52 56 60 67.5 75 82.5 90 90+ 312.5 335 350 382.5 405 445 482.5 5‘ 5 552.5 2 .5 532.5 Ellie 230 300 320 335 372 5 402 5 432 5 450 235 252.5 270 255 302.5 335 362.5 33 7 .5 412.5 435 Classl 2‘0 162.5 222 5 195 24:0 2‘0 255 222.5 270 237.5 297 5 262.5 317 5 280 345 302.5 367 5 317.5 337 5 Class ll 337.5 Class III 1575 44 1675 I 45 1825 52 190 55 2025 I 60 2225 I67.5I 1‘0 1175 1275 135 1‘25 25 90 100 105 1125 825 871) 925 72.5 77.5 85 240 75 2575 [82.5] 435 Master 2775 90 2925 Class W [90+ 1575 1725 185 200 1325 1435 160 170 185 1175 1325 145 155 1675 180 Master ‘025 1C75 117.5 130 140 1521) "(525 Class! 87.5 97.5 105 112.5 125 135 5215 II) ['5 7/5) 8?!) 925 1025 1'0 1‘!) 5.5 57.5 62.5 65 72 5 80 85 92.5 1C2}: IMI4BI52I56]60]67.5I75|82.5I90 bli's'si" H Class III 65.5 755 77'“ W. ' . . ' 95.0 Classlll ' 75.0 BUD 85.0 81.3) ‘425 Class II '27!) Claafilll ‘07.5 Class IV 90+ 7.) 80 85 90 97.5 70 72.5 77.1: 52.5 87.5 97.5 105 1'0 117.5 ‘27.!) Eli“! 60 L717 72.5 7'5 80 87.5 92.5 102.5 107.5 ‘12.!) Master 7 .5 55 6o 62.5 70 :7 0 52.5 32.17 d 7 .5 07.5 50 6 52.5 35 37‘ b 42 {7 [44148152] Clai'ssi 215 Int'lElik: ‘975 Elill: 130 137.5 147.5 117.5 127.5 105 112 ‘ 120 130 30 85 90 97.5 102—1: biz—ski" 5 60 65 72.5 9 75 90 class. II 30 Class Ill 41".) 52 b 57.3) [:10 51) . ~15 ‘31:: InI'I Elite 7’0 Class IV 56160I67.5175182.5]90190+ 15 5 160 182.5 5 2‘0 220 230 ln'l'lElilo 137.5 145 1525 167.5 180 192.5 202.5 107.5 115 125 132.5 13-5 7 152.5 152.5 172.5 185 192.5 Mum 97.5 105 112.5 '175 125 137.5 ms 157.5 105 172.5 bla's'sl lb 2 82.1: 81.5 92.1: 97.5 101.2) 130 112.51 140 120 147 .5 127.5 155 Class II 135613351“ 62.5 70 75 80 82.5 90 97.5 105 1‘0 5 Class IV 97.5 212.5 Elite .1 I 5‘0 262 5 Classl Class Ill OPEN 562.5 InI‘I Elite Cl Raw Cl Raw CI Raw Cl Raw Cl Raw Cl Raw Cl Raw CI Raw Cl Raw Cl Raw 48 Maslm Class IV Class III . 52 56 60 67.5 75 320 M0 365 390 412.5 455 265 285 305 325 345 377.5 82.5 490 4‘ 90 555 482 5 517 5 MO OPEN 90+ 525 595 Inl'l Elltu 545 Ellie 470 495 Master 420 442 5 Class I 185 197 5 215 225 240 265 285 307 5 322 5 5 Gag“ I 347 5 Class III 160 170 185 105 207.5 225 245 262.5 282.5 297.5 Class IV 165 1825 1‘5 125 132 5 140 ‘525 105 2125 105 1125 120 130 ‘375 1 25 167.5 180 195 975 102.5 110 1175 ‘275 1375 1525 1625 175 225 Inl'l Elile 2075 EH!!! '90 Master 85 92.5 100 105 ‘12 5 125 137 5 145 160 ‘70 Classl 775 825 875 925 ‘025 1'0 120 130 140 ‘525 Classll 82. 87.5 97 5 105 112 5 120 132.5 Class III 775 825 90 975 1075 1125 Class lV ‘37 5 Inl'l Elite . 65 72 5 77.5 575 625 55 75 8O 85 90 97 5 105 112 5 120 130 .5 82.5 87.5 {17 5 105 1‘0 117.5 62.5 70 80 85 90 57.5 70 "27.5 Elllc 2 5 Mas‘er Classl . Classll Classlll 57.5 625 52.5 45.0 55.0 47.5 . 77.5 32.5 875 925 55 60 67.5 60.0 725 65.0 80.0 67.5 82.5 72.5 42.5 47.5 50 52.5 55 60 65 72.5 35 37 5 42 5 45 47 5 52 5 57. 5 60 44 Master Class IV 7 . 62 5 67 5 72 5 75.0 525 B7 5 95.0 48 52 56 130 137 5 147 5 1175 1275 137.5 T2. I 60 I675] 160 155 182 5 I 82.5 I 75 ‘025 Classl 90 Class II 80 Classlll 75 55 70 Ch! as IV I 90+ 90 19 5 2‘0 223 230 Inl'l Ellle 145 1525 1675 180 1925 202 5 107.5 1‘5 125 132.5 ‘37 5 152 5 162.5 172 5 185 ‘92 5 Master 975 105 1125 1175 125 1375 145 1575 165 ‘ 7 25 Classl 85 925 160 105 1‘0 120 130 140 147.5 75 825 87.5 925 975 1075 1125 120 1275 Class II '35 Classlll 62.5 70 75 80 62.5 90 97.5 105 1‘0 ‘15 Class IV 2125 Elile ‘55 OVERVIEW OF THE FHASES Hypertrophy Strength Peaking Deload Transitional Weeks Bridge Phases We implement a phasic system into our training to ensure that each necessary quality for the powerlifter is developed to its fullest abilities and that the athlete achieves their highest fitness levels for their competition, not before or after. A phasic system for powerlifting will primarily focus on training for Hypertrophy, General Strength and Peaking, organized strategically to bring the athlete to the competicompeti— tion platform with the most muscle, greatest strength, best technique, prepared neural qualities and lowest fatigue possible. A phasic structure, when implemented correctly, allows each quality-hypertrophy, quality—hypertrophy, strength, and peaking/neural force production-to production—to be developed to a higher level than if these qualities were trained simultaneously. While all of these qualities are important to a powerlifter’s powerlifter's success, training simultaneously to improve qualities of the 10rm form (hypertrophy) and 1rm lrm (peaking) will compete against each other, generating too much muscular fatigue through hypertrophy to allow for maximum performance in the 1rm irm and too much neural fatigue, as well as stress on the connective tissue, from peaking to push the volume to the necessary levels for optimal hypertrophy. A common rere— frain from critics of phasic training is that the athlete is constantly moving away from the last quality-most quality—most notably losing muscle as they transition away from hypertrophy and approach a meet, that would only be an issue if imim— proper phase lengths and overloading parameters were utilized. Nobody can dispute that a block dedicated purely to Hypertrophy will be the best way to add muscle mass and when the subsequent General Strength phase is sufficiently voluminous, there will be no risk of losing muscle during this time. While volume will inevitably drop during a peakpeak— ing phase, choosing an appropriate length peaking block for the athlete’s athlete's qualification will allow you to avoid any muscle atrophy during this phase heading into a meet. In this next section, I will briefly outline the goals and overover— loading parameters of each key phase of our training. We will expand on each phase in later sections Hypertrophy Training for Hypertrophy creates the foundation of success for a powerlifter. Simply put, the athlete with more muscle mass has a greater potential to lift heavier weights, as well as being more durable to hard training. Hypertrophic gains are driven by increases in volume, so your focus should be on increasing number of sets, the number of reps per set, weight or some combination of the 3 over time. Goals Build Muscle Increase Work Capacity Avoid Adaptive Resistance to Heavy Training Avoid Adaptive Resistance to Technical Development in Competitive Lifts Overloading Overloading Parameters Parameters 55-75% 55—75% of 1rm lrm Sets of 6 to 12 12 Reps Increases in total volume will lead to Hypertrophic gains. Volume Volume Ranges Ranges Minimum Effective Volumes -Squat: —Squat: 5 to 10 10 Overloading Sets/Week -Bench: —Bench: 6 to 12 12 Overloading Sets/Week -Deadlift: —Deadlift: 4 to 7 Overloading Sets/Week Maximum Recoverable Volumes -Squat: —Squat: 10 10 to 16 lo Overloading Sets/Week -Bench: —Bench: 14 14 to 20 Overloading Sets/Week -Deadlift: —Deadlift: 8 to 14 M Overloading Sets/Week Strength Goals Improve Force Production Begin Technical Development of Competitive Exercises Maintain Muscle Mass Developed During Hypertrophy Overloading Overloading Parameters Parameters 70-90% 70—90% of 1rm 1rm Sets of 3 to 6o Reps Strength adaptations necessitate increases in intensity over time time Volume Volume Ranges Ranges Minimum Effective Volumes Volumes -Squat: —Squat: 3 to 8 Overloading Sets/Week -Bench: —Bench: 5 to 11 11 Overloading Sets/Week -Deadlift: —Deadlift: 3 to 6 Overloading Sets/Week Maximum Recoverable Volumes Volumes -Squat: —Squat: 6 o to 12 12 Overloading Sets/Week -Bench: —Bench: 8 to 16 16 Overloading Sets/Week -Deadlift: —Deadlift: 4 to 10 10 Overloading Sets/Week g “1!! w in! E7 ” . . . 1- .543 asp r- -'-."~—:3I i t 4/ .. . o u U h L Peaking Peaking training is a uniquely important phase of the comcom— petitive powerlifter’s powerlifter's training. This phase is the culmination of a well designed and diligently executed training program and while it is unlikely that great peaking training can salsal— vage poor efforts preceding it, it is very possible for a poorly organized peaking plan to cause your previous hard work to be squandered. Optimal peaking training hinges on striking a balance between developing technical precision, building neural force production and optimizing the fitness/fatigue relationship for the day of competition. Goals Develop Technical Prowess Enhance Neural Force Production Maintain Fitness from Previous Blocks Decay Fatigue for Day of Competition Overloading Overloading Parameters Parameters 85-100% 85—1 00% of 1rm 1rm Sets of 1l to 3 Reps High-intensity High—intensity lifts are needed to practice competition techtech— nique and improve neural qualities. Volume Volume Ranges Ranges Minimum Effective Volumes Volumes -Squat: —Squat: 2 to 7 Overloading Sets/Week -Bench: —Bench: 4 to 9 Overloading Sets/Week -Deadlift: —Deadlift: 11 to 4 Overloading Sets/Week Maximum Recoverable Volumes Volumes -Squat: —Squat: 3 to 9 Overloading Sets/Week -Bench: —Bench: 5 to 12 12 Overloading Sets/Week -Deadlift: —Deadlift: 2 to 7 Overloading Sets/Week Deload Deload The Deload is a very important though often overlooked aspect of effective and sustainable training. Some lifters and coaches want to lead you to believe that deloads aren’t aren't necessary or that feeling you need a deload is an indicaindica— tion that you haven’t haven't prioritized recovery properly, to those people, I would respond that their normal training isn’t isn't as overloading and thus, effective, as it could be. Good training is very challenging and should be accompanied by planned deloads organized around times of functional overreaching. Goals Goals Decay Fatigue Create Smooth Transition from One Phase to the Next Overloading Overloading Parameters Parameters 80-90% 80—90% of Normal Training Intensity 50-75% 50—75% of Normal Training Volume For example, if you did 5x8 Squats with 150kg 150kg during the last week of a Hypertrophy Phase, an appropriate Deload could be 3x8 at 130kg, iBOkg, 4x6 at 130kg 130kg would also be effective. 7 ‘ li J _. . mlJtllH,’ I. ll: . 'J _ ,iUI-PA + Transitional Transitional Weeks Weeks Transitional Weeks are a strategy that we use to create a smooth transition after competition back into higher volvol— ume training. A common situation that arises is an athlete goes through a 4 week peaking block and taper where they perform sets of 1-3 1—3 reps almost exclusively, they compete in the meet where they do 9 singles, they likely take the week off after ...
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