Where_did_the_ideas_that_influenced_the_Scientific_Revolution_come_from_ (1).docx

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Where did the ideas that influenced the Scientific Revolution come from? Contextualize Like the artists in the Renaissance, scholars during the Scientific Revolution owed the foundation of their work to Greek, Roman, and Muslim scholars that came before them. The ideas and techniques that enabled the start of the Scientific Revolution were passed around the Mediterranean world from one Golden Age to another. Trade between the Ottoman Empire and Europe, and Byzantine scholars who left Constantinople for Italy after the Ottoman Empire conquered it in 1453, led to the rediscovery of Greek and Roman text that had been kept in the Middle East during the chaotic European Middle Ages. In addition, Muslim scholars made great strides in science and their ideas were shared with Europeans and contributed to the discoveries made during the Scientific Revolution. Scientists in each of these societies added to the original ideas, conducted their own experiments, and passed on what they learned. Through this process of collective learning and the evaluation of ideas through the scientific method, individuals who took part in the Scientific Revolution made incredible achievements that gave humans a greater understanding of the world around them. Corroborate Directions: After examining the text and images on the next three pages, answer the accompanying questions, then fill in the table below with evidence that supports the claim. Claim: The Scientific Revolution was greatly impacted by scientific discoveries outside of Europe before the Scientific Revolution. Evidence 1: Evidence 2: Evidence 3: Evidence 4: Like the artists in the Renaissance, scholars during the Scientific Revolution owed the foundation of their work to Greek, Roman, and Muslim scholars that came before them. The start of the Scientific Revolution was from ideas that were passed around the Mediterranean world. The rediscovery in Greek and Roman was caused by trading. Great strides in science in their ideas that were shared with the Europeans were originally from Muslim scholars looking into the philosophical side of the world.
“The Nature of Comets” from Albertus Magnus Albertus Magnus (1193-1280) was a German bishop in the Catholic Church, doctor, and philosopher who pre- dated the Scientific Revolution. As as a member of the clergy, he had access to scientific texts that most others in Medieval Europe did not. The text below comes from a writing of his in which he discusses the nature of comets. We will give the correct view about comets, and confirm it by the authority of many physicists. I say, then, that a comet is nothing else than a coarse earthly vapor or fumes; coarse, because if it were thin it would quickly evaporate and dissolve. It gradually rises from the bottom of the layer of air to the top, where it touches the curved inner surface of the sphere of fire. There it is thinned out by the heat

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