BGS_G1_Assignment.docx - Case study Resort World...

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Case study: Resort World Sentosa’s Whale Shark & Dolphin Exhibits Prepared by: Charis Koh | G1
Table of Contents 1.0 Objective 3 1.1 Background 3 2.0 Analysis of Whale Shark Exhibit 4 2.1 Stakeholder Identification 4 2.2 Stakeholder Interests, Power and Coalitions 4 2.3 Stakeholder Salience Mapping 5 2.4 Performance-Expectations Gap 5 3.0 Analysis of Dolphin Exhibit 6 3.1 Stakeholder Identification 6 3.2 Stakeholder Interests, Power and Coalitions 7 3.3 Stakeholder Salience Mapping 8 3.4 Performance-Expectations Gap 9 4.0 Analysis of Major Issues 9 5.0 Analysis of RWS Stakeholder Engagement Tactics 10 6.0 Conclusion 11 2
1.0 Objective This case study will analyse the various interactions between the managers of Resorts World Sentosa (RWS) and its relevant stakeholders. Both the incidents regarding the whale shark and dolphin exhibits will be analysed with regards to the stakeholders involved (that were mentioned in the case), their interests, powers, coalitions, saliency and how RWS engaged them. 1.1 Background RWS is one of the world’s most expensive integrated resorts, valued at $6.59 billion. It aims to enrich the public understanding and knowledge of marine conversation, with its Marine Life Park (MLP) acting as a showcase for marine education and stewardship. In 2006, RWS announced that it would bring in both a whale shark exhibit and a bottlenose dolphin exhibit in MLP. However, not long after, it received heavy criticism from various animal activist groups. In this case, it was the Society for Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (SPCA) and the Animal Concerns Research and Education Society (ACRES). 3 years later, RWS revealed that they wouldn’t be proceeding with the whale shark exhibit and instead, would focus on pushing out their dolphin exhibits. It soon imported 27 Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphins from the Solomon Islands. This was for the purpose of starting up a potential breeding programme. Unfortunately, two of their dolphins did not make it back to Singapore and died at a holding area in Langkawi. This was the start of many issues, inciting the previously-mentioned animal activist groups and other supporters to step forward and attack RWS through engaging its business, government and public stakeholders. 3
2.0 Analysis of the whale shark case 2.1 Stakeholder Identification A stake is a form of interest in the business. As such, one form of a stakeholder would be employees of MLP who were in charge of taking care of the whale sharks. Next are the potential customers who were looking forward to seeing the whale sharks. ACRES, the SPCA and other Non-Governmental Organisations (NGOs) are also considered stakeholders when they involved themselves in the issue. Campaign supporters from the public are stakeholders as well. 2.2 Stakeholders’ Interests, Power and Coalition Stakeholder Nature of Interest Nature of Power SPCA, ACRES, NGOs, Campaign supporters - Get enough support to prevent from RWS from continuing with the Whale Shark exhibits Informational Power - Used studies and data to emphasise on the low survival rates of captured whale sharks,

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