Grade A: The Market for a Yale Woman's Eggs - Lucas...

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Lucas DonnellyPeriod:1BGrade A: The Market for a Yale Woman's EggsIn Jessica Cohen’s Grade A: The Market for a Yale Woman’s Eggs, published in 2001 in The New Journal, she proposes that “The money might have changed my life for a while, but it would have led to the creation of a child encumbered with too many expectations.” (p.23) Cohen begins the narrative with an explanation of how she found the ad looking for a very certain, one might say rare set of qualities within an egg donor. Cohen fit all these expectations and decided she may as well apply to the couple for a shot at their $25000 price upon the eggs she had to donate. Cohen then tells of the process in which one must take not only to register as a donor, butthe steps one must take to donate the eggs. This process comes with a very hefty set of potential hazards, both physically in the donors body, and through the company one donates through. Cohen continues by explaining her experience with the family wanting to receive her eggs, and the very strict set of qualities they desired. She must send in pictures of herself, explain her heritage, and tell of her academic status. Still after this the couple is not sure if she is the one; Cohen even finds in paragraph 22 another ad from the same family on a seperate site. The rudeness of these parents, especially the soon to be mother changes Cohen’s outlook on donating eggs. She realizes that yes, she would benefit heavily from the $25000 payout, but the child wouldn’t. She would never want her eggs to become an unhappy child. A child drowning in the expectations of its parents. A child who never got the chance to be what they want. Cohen tells inthe final paragraph that no child should grow up in these conditions. Every child deserves a kind,

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