E04 Chapter 14 Notes.docx - E04 Chapter 14 Notes Children Exposed to Violence Children may experience trauma through exposure to violence We may prefer

E04 Chapter 14 Notes.docx - E04 Chapter 14 Notes Children...

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E04 Chapter 14 Notes: Children Exposed to Violence Children may experience trauma through exposure to violence. We may prefer to think that violence is only in certain neighborhoods, but it can pervade all types of communities. With the prevalence of guns in our society, violence is part of our culture; children may be afraid to go to school after hearing about school shootings or there may be some other place in their community where a shooting or bombing occurred. You may have refugee immigrant children in your classroom who have fled war zones and lost family members in the process. Child Abuse You have heard about instances of child abuse in the news. Unfortunately, these stories are becoming more frequent. According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (2010) , a report of child abuse is made every 10 seconds, and more than five children die every day as a result of child abuse. Chances are, you will work with a child who has been abused. Although most of us could never imagine abusing a baby, infants are more likely to experience abuse than older children, and 80% of children who die from child abuse are under the age of 4. Child neglect includes ignoring requests for attention, leaving them unattended, and not attending to their physical needs for food, shelter, and safety. Physical abuse includes harmful spanking or slapping, but we have all read horror stories of much worse. Emotional abuse commonly includes verbal threats, name-calling, rejection, and isolation. When a parent is the source of trauma, the usual source of safety and security is gone and the world is a scary place Community Violence Children are exposed to violence in their families, schools, and communities at an alarming rate Parental conflict and gang violence have seriously negative effects on children’s social and emotional development. Exposure to violence makes children fearful, anxious, and in some cases causes symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder . Prolonged stress causes damage to the dendrites of the brain and impairs children’s ability to manage emotions. Young children experiencing such trauma show physical, emotional, academic, and relational difficulties Children exposed to violence require extra support to feel safe and comfortable at school. If you have students with such experiences, there are several things you can do You can have a soft and calming place in your classroom and help children retreat to it when needed; though we have previously suggested this for all children, damaged children will benefit the most. Children Experiencing Loss and Separation Children Who Are in Foster Care or Have Been Adopted
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There is a good chance that you will teach students who are in foster care or who have joined a new family through adoption. The Adoption and Foster Care Analysis
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