solvinghardy 2007

solvinghardy 2007 - Solving Hardy-Weinberg problems In each...

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Solving Hardy-Weinberg problems In each of the H-W problems, you are given a single locus (one gene) trait, that has two different alleles. An example is the moth question, with dark (D) versus light (d) wing color. Most of the cases also involve dominance, so that DD and Dd give you dark, while only dd gives you light wings. Note to self: Don’t panic; this isn’t really different than what we did with the first two lectures on Mendelian genetics, when we crossed heterozygotes, e.g., Dd x Dd, and got DD, Dd and dd genotypes. It’s just that in the Punnett squares, we assumed that the frequency of D and d were each .5. Now the frequencies of those alleles can be different. Two important terms: ALLELE frequencies: how many D vs d (or p vs q) GENOTYPIC frequencies: how many DD vs Dd vs dd (or , p 2 vs 2pq vs q 2 ) The idea behind H-W is that if you know the relative proportion (% of D vs d) of the two alleles in the population, you can figure out how many of each genotype there should be
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solvinghardy 2007 - Solving Hardy-Weinberg problems In each...

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