Test III - Questions#1-5 refer to the following information...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Questions #1-5 refer to the following information. Populations of European clover, Trifolium repens , produce cyanide, which increases their resistance to herbivores such as mice and slugs. However, production of cyanide is energetically costly to the plants. Cyanide production is determined at single gene locus and is dominant (i.e., non-cyanide plants are homozygous recessive). 1. A student notes that the frequency of plants that produce cyanide varies among populations in Europe. She states that ‘selective pressure by herbivores maintains cyanide-producing plants in clover populations’. This statement best represents which part of the scientific method? a. observation b. hypothesis c. prediction d. result e. conclusion 2. In 2004, she counts the frequency of cyanide plants and finds that 36% of all plants do not produced cyanide, and 64% are cyanide producers. Based upon this information, what can she conclude about the frequency of the non-cyanide allele in this population? In 2004, the student performs an experiment. She divides the population into 8 sections. In 4 of the 8 sections she constructs a barrier that excludes all herbivores, including, mice and slugs. The other 4 sections are open to all herbivores. In 2007, she then determines the frequency of cyanide and non-cyanide plants in the sections, with the following results (bars are the mean frequency of cyanide plants in the four sections of each treatment in 2004 (before the experiment began) and 3 years later in 2007): Mean Percent Cyanide Plants 0 20 40 60 80 100 2004 2007 Barrier No Barrier 1
Image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
3. Based upon these results, what is the best conclusion regarding the statement she made (in Question #1)?
Image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern