714192340_Reporting_the_News_from _he_Front_Lines.docx - Running head REPORTING THE NEWS FROM THE FRONT LINES Reporting the News from the Front Lines

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Running head: REPORTING THE NEWS FROM THE FRONT LINES 1 Reporting the News from the Front Lines Name Institute Affiliation
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REPORTING THE NEWS FROM THE FRONT LINES 2 Reporting the News from the Front Lines The Stalingrad battle was among one of the most influential wars on the Eastern Front during the Second World War. It was a vicious military confrontation between Nazi Germany and the Russian forces. Most people may not know this, but the battle went into history as the most prominent, longest and bloody engagement in warfare. In between the 23rd of August 1942 and the 2nd of February 1943 over two million people were either killed or fell casualties of the war, including a large population of Russian civilians (Charles River Editors, 2016). In the long run, the battle flipped the outcome of World War II into favoring the Allied forces. The war is believed to have begun in 1942 when the German troop tried taking control of Stalingrad city after their invasion into the Soviet Union. By October the Germans had their hand on almost the entire city, but in November 1942 Russians found a way to cut supplies to the Germans. By cutting the German troops from their supplies, Russia was able to trap thousands of soldiers in the city. Bloody fighting continues in the cold weather as Adolf Hitler tried to reach his soldier suppliers through the air. Unfortunately, this attempt was not sufficient, and after two months the Germans were forced to surrender. With the win of the Allied forces division was created among Hitler’s German High Command. Some leaders began to see the tactical mistakes that Hitler had make in his obsession to seize the city. The determination that Hitler had in capturing Stalingrad led him into dispatching the 6th army on a task that they were prone to failure. The outcome of the battle was of significance since it marked the end of Germany’s invasion and conquering Russia and Eastern Europe. Stalingrad was the first primary lost for Germany in the Second World War (Glantz, 2011). And after this loss, they never advanced farther into Russia and Eastern Europe since the Soviet army had gained more strength. For the rest of the World War II, the Germans were fought to give back the territories they had deprived
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