24 ways to make meals more nutrient dense.docx - 24 ways to make meals more nutrient dense ShareThis There\u2019s no doubt that a nutrient-rich diet

24 ways to make meals more nutrient dense.docx - 24 ways to...

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24 ways to make meals more nutrient dense ShareThis There’s no doubt that a nutrient-rich diet reduces the risk of disease. But how do you make it work? If you’ve tried, you already know that making huge, sweeping changes—such as swearing off sugar, eating fish four times a week, or tripling your intake of vegetables—is easier said than done. And when those efforts fail, it makes us more likely to throw up our hands in disgust and revert to our old habits. A better approach to a more nutrient-rich diet: make one small change every day such as swapping green tea for coffee. Here are 24 more sneaky ways to make your diet more nutrient dense: 1. Buy organic vegetables whenever possible. Besides avoiding pesticide residues, you may get more nutrients—some studies and reviews have found that organic fruits and vegetables contain, on average, 25 percent higher concentrations of 11 nutrients than their conventional counterparts. 2. Dress your salad with avocado instead of store-bought creamy dressings. You’ll increase your intake of folate and lower your intake of unhealthy fats—which ultimately will protect your heart. For a simple dressing, purée avocado and lemon juice, then season with salt and pepper.
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3. Choose an English muffin instead of a bagel for a 220-calorie savings . The average whole-grain bagel is 350 calories, versus 130 for an English muffin. If you really need a bagel fix, try Rudi’s new Bagel Flatz with just 110 calories per Flatz (in Plain and 100% Whole Wheat). And top it with almond butter instead of cream cheese to get a protein boost without added calories. 4. Choose whole-grain instead of multi-grain. Whole-grain means the entire grain kernel, including all the fiber, has been included. Multi-grain means only that more than one type of grain was used—and those grains could be refined and stripped of fiber and nutrients. 5. Use white bean spread instead of mayo on your sandwiches. This gives you an extra boost of fiber and protein with fewer calories. Purée white beans, olive oil, garlic, and a splash of apple cider vinegar to make a creamy spread; season with salt and white pepper.
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