VitalSigns2019.pdf - REPORT 2019\/20 TORONTO\u2019S VITAL SIGNS We would like to acknowledge that we are situated upon traditional territories of the

VitalSigns2019.pdf - REPORT 2019/20 TORONTOu2019S VITAL...

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Unformatted text preview: REPORT 2019/20 TORONTO’S VITAL SIGNS We would like to acknowledge that we are situated upon traditional territories of the Huron-Wendat, Anishinabek Nation, the Haudenosaunee Confederacy, and the Mississaugas of the Credit First Nation. Today, the meeting place of “Tkaronto” (Toronto) is still the home to many Indigenous peoples from across Turtle Island, and we are grateful to have the opportunity to work in the community, on this territory. TABLE OF CONTENTS INTRODUCTION 4 About Toronto Foundation About this Report 5 Acknowledgments 8 A Letter from Sharon Avery 10 Executive Summary 17 Toronto’s Changing Demographics THE ISSUE AREAS 24 Income and Wealth 34 Housing 45 GRASSROOTS LEADER STORY 89 GRASSROOTS LEADER STORY 90 Health and Wellness Fazilatun Nessa Babli Charles Zhu 100 Learning 46 Work 108 Safety 56 Arts, Culture, and Recreation 117 GRASSROOTS LEADER STORY 63 GRASSROOTS LEADER STORY 118 GRASSROOTS LEADER STORY 64 Environment 72 Getting Around 80 Civic Engagement and Belonging Issaq Ahmed Keith McCrady Angelita Buado CONCLUSION 119 Next Steps 123 Endnotes 4 VITAL SIGNS REPORT 2019/20 ABOUT TORONTO FOUNDATION Established in 1981, Toronto Foundation is a registered charity and one of 191 Community Foundations in Canada. We pool philanthropic dollars and facilitate charitable donations for maximum community impact. Our individual, family, and organizational funds number more than 500, and we administer more than $400 million in assets. Through strategic granting, thought leadership, and convening, we engage in city building to strengthen the quality of life in Toronto. Philanthropists come to us to help simplify and enhance their charitable giving in Toronto and across Canada. We also offer a community of like-minded people for those who want to make connections, learn, and amplify their impact by collaborating with others. OUR MISSION OUR VISION To connect philanthropy to community needs and opportunities. A city of informed, engaged philanthropists accelerating meaningful change for all. VALUES Brave, thoughtful action. Humility in our relationships. Public trust above all. PURPOSE We aim to create a more fair and just society, where everyone can thrive by mobilizing those with resources and the will to partner with others. The new philanthropy focuses on co-creating a society that fights exclusion and marginalization, creates a sense of well-being and belonging, and promotes trust. ABOUT THIS REPORT Toronto’s Vital Signs Report is compiled from current statistics and studies, serving as an ongoing consolidated snapshot of the trends and issues affecting quality of life in our city. Continuing the focus from last year, we used an equity lens to better understand the different experiences of unique population groups in the city and in relation to the overall trends. New this year, we went beyond published reports to analyze secondary data that is not generally available. We believe this adds considerable value to our collective insights on life in Toronto and enhances our ability to focus on the most vital issues in the city. Throughout the report, we highlight organizations working on solutions and feature select policy recommendations from leading researchers and organizations. This report has more than 600 footnotes, references more than 294 unique reports and data sources, and received contributions from more than 100 individuals. While we did our best to accurately convey the content in each chapter, and each of these chapters had both internal and external review, mistakes inevitably slipped through. We sincerely apologize to anyone whose data was misrepresented. If this was the case, please let us know, and we will ensure future versions do not include the same mistakes. 5 VITAL SIGNS REPORT 2019/20 ACKNOWLEDGMENTS The Vital Signs initiative involves the work of countless organizations and people. We sincerely thank all who contributed and hope we have not missed anyone in this list. All opinions and interpretations in this report are the opinions and perspectives of the author and editorial team and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of any organizations or people we acknowledge here. Lead researcher and author Steven Ayer Copy editor and proofreader Jennifer D. Foster ORGANIZATIONS Executive editor and producer Toronto Foundation staff GRASSROOTS LEADERS TABLE Toronto Foundation is grateful to the following grassroots leaders who reviewed an early summary of the report and provided feedback. Their input informed the overall Vital Signs initiative and will continue to influence the work of Toronto Foundation. Special thanks to Phylicia Davis-Wesseling, who led this project. We consulted with many organizations in the compilation of Vital Signs this year. The following are some that offered data and perspectives across the 10 issue areas we cover. In the “Next Steps” chapter of this report, we list additional organizations whose work demonstrates action on addressing some of the issues identified in our report. Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation City of Toronto Resilience Office Children’s Services City Planning Issaq Ahmed Zamani Ra Angelita Buado Karlene Ruddock Jacqueline Dwyer Beverly Scarlett Mussarat Ejaz Janel Simpson Information & Technology Bri Gardner Alana Smith Parks, Forestry & Recreation Ko Hosoya Suzanna Su Shelter, Support & Housing Administration Sureya Ibrahim Miyadah Subrati Noel Livington Bernadette Thomas Gerard Meade Mary Williams Feroza Mohammed Donna Yong Augustre Munro Charles Zhu Safia Perveen We also thank the staff at Agincourt Community Services Association and Parkdale Activity-Recreation Centre for graciously opening their community spaces to host these conversations. Civic Innovation Office Economic Development & Culture Environment & Energy Social Development, Finance & Administration Toronto Public Health Community Foundations of Canada Environics Institute Toronto Aboriginal Support Services Council Toronto District School Board Toronto Environmental Alliance United Way of Greater Toronto Wellesley Institute Workforce Planning Board of York Region 6 VITAL SIGNS REPORT 2019/20 INDIVIDUALS To the many individuals who provided substantive feedback, edits, perspectives and opinions, and helped us access research, thank you as well. Your input was crucial. Aderonke Akande Devon Hurvid Daphna Nussbaum Tamara Augsten James Iveniuk Ceta Ramkhalawansingh Paul Bakker Lauralyn Johnston Julian Robbins Neala Barton Yasmin Kassam Brenda Roche Deborah Berlin Jeremy Kloet Imara Rolston Soraya Blot Lindsay Kretschmer Dana Senagama Amy Buitenhuis William Krueger Alison Sidney David Cameron Riley Kucheran Paul Smetanin John Chasty Paula Kwan Magda Smolewski Paul Chisholm Kallee Lins Greg Suttor Wayne Chu Harvey Low Jake Tobin Garrett Sarah Collier Jia Lu Kiera Toffelmire Cynthia Damba David Macleod Dina Tsirlin Larissa Deneau Raglan Maddox Ene Underwood Ralph Dimaano Emmay Mah Allison Urowitz Mihaela Dinca Panaitescu John Malloy Jennifer Verschraegen Suzanne Dwyer Dia Mamatis Greg Wilkinson Stephen Faul Heather Marshall Beth Wilson Paul Fleiszer Burkhard Mausberg Michael Wright Alexandra Gardner Andrew McConnachie Maria Yau Daniel Gee Sean McIntyre Vivien Yip Michelle German Sean Meagher Tom Zizys Stephanie Gower Keith Neuman Ken Zolotar Kira Heineck Jeff Nicholls We are also grateful to the founders of Toronto’s Vital Signs Report, Maytree and Laidlaw Foundation, and in particular, Alan Broadbent and Nathan Gilbert, who created the model in 2001 to monitor quality of life in Toronto. The report found its home at Toronto Foundation in 2003 to allow for long-term stewardship and to catalyze the findings. Since 2006, Community Foundations of Canada has co-ordinated the national and international replication of Vital Signs, which is now being used by 32 Canadian communities and 80 globally. 7 VITAL SIGNS REPORT 2019/20 TORONTO FOUNDATION BOARD OF DIRECTORS Bill MacKinnon (Board Chair) Corporate Director Claire Duboc (Board Vice-Chair) Managing Director, BEACON/CBT Associates Greg Wilkinson (Board Vice-Chair) Principal, Ontario, Earnscliffe Strategy Group Neala Barton Vice-President, Communications and Client Experience, Canadian Institute for Health Information Michael Brooks CEO, Real Property Association of Canada Brenda Lee-Kennedy Partner, Taxation, Price Waterhouse Coopers Management Services, LLP Elizabeth Aqui-Seto Office Coordinator Nancy McCain Chair, Arts Access Fund Sharon Avery President & CEO Dennis Mitchell CEO and CIO, Starlight Capital André Perey (Corporate Secretary) Partner, Osler, Hoskin & Harcourt LLP Ceta Ramkhalawansingh Corporate Equity and Diversity Manager, City of Toronto (Retired) Lola Rasminsky Founding Director, Avenue Road Arts School Rick Goldsmith Retiree Partner, KPMG John L. Sherrington Investment Banker Edward Greenspon President & CEO, Public Policy Forum Andrew Spence Investment Professional & Economist Sue Griggs Leadership Coach, The Coaching Project Inc. Martin Connell (Chair Emeritus) Sandy Houston President & CEO, Metcalf Foundation TORONTO FOUNDATION STAFF Sharon Avery (Ex officio) President & CEO, Toronto Foundation Denise Arsenault Chief Operating Officer Anne Brayley Senior Advisor, Philanthropy Sasha Chabot-Gaspé Public Relations Coordinator Sarah Chiddy Manager, Executive Office Simone Dalton Director, Communications Tyler Demers Community Initiatives Program Officer Aruna Dey Communications Officer David Fox Grants Administrator Nadien Godkewitsch Senior Manager, Transformation Aneil Gokhale Director, Philanthropy Lisa Grislis Director, Fundholder Engagement Julia Howell Vice President, Community Engagement Torey Kehoe Fundholder Engagement Officer Sara Krynitzki Manager, Community Initiatives Nicole Lilauwala Development Coordinator Sarah Muir Manager, Fundholder Engagement Nicole Nunes Fundholder Engagement Officer Sarah Pendleton Project Manager, Community Engagement Tracy Power Administrative Officer Alec Stevenson Vice President, Finance & Administration Marya Syed Manager, Finance Georgy Thomas Accountant 8 VITAL SIGNS REPORT 2019/20 THE PHILANTHROPIC COMMUNITY’S DECLARATION OF ACTION Coinciding with the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada holding its closing events in Ottawa, a group of Canada’s philanthropic organizations (The Circle on Philanthropy and Aboriginal Peoples in Canada, Community Foundations of Canada, Philanthropic Foundations Canada, The Counselling Foundation of Canada) has prepared The Philanthropic Community’s Declaration of Action (The Declaration), committed to ensuring that positive action on reconciliation will continue. The Declaration is a call to action, inviting others to join in moving forward in an atmosphere of understanding, dignity, and respect toward the shared goal of reconciliation. The Declaration is meant to be signed by philanthropic organizations that wish to make a commitment to using their philanthropic resources in service to reconciliation. Toronto Foundation is a signatory. As part of this commitment, we aim to recognize the lives and contributions of urban Indigenous people in Toronto through the development of the Toronto’s Vital Signs Report. We have taken a first step in the production of this year’s report. But there is much work ahead to ensure that the story of quality of life in Toronto and the process of telling it are inclusive of the First Peoples. We use the term Indigenous throughout the report to describe First Nations, Métis, and Inuit people. A LETTER FROM SHARON AVERY This year’s Toronto’s Vital Signs Report comes out in the context of a booming city. GDP is up, job growth is greater than we’ve seen since 1990, and our population is skyrocketing. These are the indicators we typically associate with a successful city and they benefit many. For those who own homes and have been the beneficiaries of income and wealth growth, circumstances are better than ever before. But Vital Signs challenges this one-sided view. Our focus in producing Vital Signs is to look beyond the big, sweeping measures and explore the details within. What you will see in this year’s report is the picture of a city whose growth does not include everyone. In fact, newcomers, racialized populations, and young people are faring substantively worse than White, long-time residents and this is the case across all 10 issue areas we track. This calls us to question not only which measures of success truly matter, but also, what we can do to ensure that all of us can thrive here. Photo Credit: Setti Kidane 9 VITAL SIGNS REPORT 2019/20 In our growing city, who is being left behind, and what can you do about it? At Toronto Foundation we believe in the power of philanthropy to create meaningful change for all. It’s a small piece of the solutions puzzle, but we think it can influence the bigger shift required to tackle inequality and allow more people to benefit from growth. We’re starting by asking ourselves some important questions: Do we understand our power and privilege? Are we open to listening and learning? And who is at our decision-making tables? The ”new” philanthropy, as I see it, needs to play a role in getting us to meaningful change. The new philanthropy is participatory. It thinks about and changes the distribution of power. It amplifies the voices of those with “living experience” of the challenges it aims to alleviate. It sets the kind of table where all can have a seat and share, and celebrate our unique perspectives and experiences. It aims to move the money equitably and disrupt giving patterns. In Canada, this means turning a statistic such as this one on its head: 66% of all charitable revenue goes to just 1% of the organizations. These mostly large institutions are critical and need support, but often the most effective responses to meaningful change are those which are led by those most affected. Organizations at the grassroots level are sorely underfunded, and this limits our ability to be more inclusive. This year’s Vital Signs tells us that a White person over the age of 35 has typically experienced huge growth in inflation-adjusted income, often 60% or more over the last 30 years. Meanwhile, racialized populations, newcomers, and people under the age of 35 have seen no increase in income whatsoever. The top 20% have had their net worth increase by an average of more than $600,000 from 1999 to 2016, while the bottom 20% have seen their net worth grow by just $2,100. To put this in perspective, if you earn $224,200 you are in the 1%. To be in the top 10%, your market income is at least $90,900. Surprising? No doubt many in my usual circles would be surprised to see that at least 90% of their fellow residents earn less than they do. To be clear, I’m not here to vilify the rich. But I am determined to be a voice for change. Income and wealth are just one aspect of quality of life we analyze in our report. But they are the greatest determinants of every other issue we track — from access to transportation and the arts to health and safety. Income and wealth are also highly co-related with race, time in Canada, and neighbourhood. In other words, who you are, where you were born, and where you live in the city define your experience here and your prospects for the future. As you review this report, at the top of your mind I want you to consider: What role can I play in changing this? What organizations should I be volunteering for and funding? Who should I be voting for? What actions and activism can I be supporting? And if you’re a nonprofit leader or a policy-maker, how can I use this report to inform and inspire collective action? At Toronto Foundation, we have been taking a closer look at how we could become living proof of the new philanthropy. We believe philanthropy can play an important role in not only reducing the pains that come with growth, but also that strategic investment choices can be made to build a healthier, more prosperous city for all. Sharon Avery President & CEO 10 VITAL SIGNS REPORT 2019/20 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Toronto’s population increased by 77,000 people last year, nearly as much as the four fastest-growing cities in the United States combined. Year after year, Toronto proves an unparalleled destination for newcomers from elsewhere in Canada and from around the world. The economic pie is expanding, too. Between 2011 and 2016, the city’s GDP grew by 3.2% annually, almost twice the national pace (1.8%). The unemployment rate has hit a low not seen since 1990, declining from 10.4% in September 2014 to 6.1% by June 2019. Toronto is on a roll. Other headline numbers tell the same story. Life expectancy is among the highest in the country and is advancing. Cultural life is enriched by countless activities and amenities, including hundreds of events and festivals, art galleries, theatres, libraries, sports venues, and parks. Our universities and colleges boast record enrolments, with the greatest leaps forward happening for traditionally marginalized groups. No wonder our city is one of the top destinations in the world for immigrants. Our allure is expected to persist for years. But how broad is participation in Toronto’s growth story? When we probe the numbers more closely, we see a profound pattern of maldistribution. Despite our selfimage, Toronto does not work for all. In fact, for a growing majority, life in the city poses a serious struggle, and the trend lines suggest things will get worse before they get better. It will take concerted effort by Torontonians of goodwill to ensure our successes are widely shared — that the gains of this remarkable growth city are not overwhelmed by growing pains and exclusions. It is the exclusions that stand out most in this year’s Vital Signs. We focused our research on data that can be disaggregated by income, race, gender, ability, time in Canada, and other indicators. 11 VITAL SIGNS REPORT 2019/20 When possible, we compare these to city-wide averages. And as with all previous Vital Signs reports, we capture these data across 10 interconnected issue areas for the most comprehensive picture of quality of life in Toronto. What emerges from all of this is a city where inequality is the new normal. Dividing lines are growing. The experience of life in the city for newcomers, young people, and racialized groups is markedly — and increasingly — more challenging than for White, long-time residents. Widening gaps in income and wealth, and neighbourhood disparities are reshaping the city. If they continue, what will this mean for the Toronto of the future? Imbedded in the report are examples of community organizations tackling issues and getting results. Also included are policy recommendations by leading researchers and advocacy groups. There’s a lot more of this out there if we just look. You will also find profiles on grassroots leaders of many backgrounds whose lived experiences of the city shed light on the data and whose leadership gives hope that solutions are there — we’re just not seeing them. In fact, where we have typically seen weakness there is great strength. The solutions to our growing inequality will not come from the top down. We’ve tried that. The answers will only come when we expand our decision-making tables to include overlooked populations. There are deep reservoirs of knowledge where we have traditionally only seen need. Toronto’s Vital Signs is not prescriptive, but it can be a shared starting point. It is a unique picture that highlights the interconnectivity of issues and the unifying threads between all of us, from Indigenous nations who have owned and stewarded this land for millennia, to the recent arrivals hoping to establish a new life here. We hope it will encourage more inclusive and informed civic engagement and philanthropy. We also hope it will contribute to a tax and regulatory environment that takes into account the unmatched position of Canada’s largest, fastest growing, and most ...
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