10.4324_9781315404189-9.pdf - CHAPTER 8 Ethics and the Communication of Diversity CHAPTER OUTLINE Elements of Diversity Intercultural Communication The

10.4324_9781315404189-9.pdf - CHAPTER 8 Ethics and the...

This preview shows page 1 - 3 out of 29 pages.

155 C H A P T E R C H A P T E R O U T L I N E Ethics and the Communication of Diversity 8 Elements of Diversity Intercultural Communication The Concept of Culture Cultural Rules of Communication Reservations about Cultural Rules of Communication Ethical Perspectives on Intercultural Communication Coordinated Management of Meaning Theory Dialogical Communication Third-Culture Building Communication and People with Disabilities People-First Language Dialogical Ethics Applied to Disabilities Rawls: Contemporary Social Justice Kant’s Deontological Ethics and Disabilities Applications: Tolerance and Diversity: Hate Speech, Political Correctness Case Study: Security and Tolerance Questions for Analysis of the Case Chapter Summary Questions and Topics for Discussion Notes The USA Today on September 30, 2004, reported that minorities are becoming a majority in more and more parts of the United States. 1 In 280 counties out of 3,141 in the country, Whites who are not Hispanic are no longer in the majority. The trend has accelerated since then. In 2014, 50.2% of children five years of age were designated as minorities. The Census Bureau projec- tions predict that by 2060, 56.2% of the total population of the United States will consist of what are now defined as minorities. 2 As a state, California has not had an ethnic majority for several years, and Texas is rapidly approach- ing or may already have joined California in that designation. Major cities such as Denver and Detroit do not have a specific racial or ethnic major- ity either. Furthermore, the so-called demographic upheaval means that the
Image of page 1
156 Issues, Settings, and Applications majority–minority divide is no longer a simple Black-and-White affair, given the growing populations of Asian and Hispanic background. As part of this trend, we may soon find that the word “minority,” used as a demographic category, will no longer be used or even considered acceptable. Concerning the ethics of labels for people, many people now object to the term “minor- ity” anyway as implying diminished importance or status. Issues related to communication and diversity raise major concerns in many different arenas—as clearly shown in the news and online and social media. As this book is being written, the movement Black Lives Matter high- lights protests about police treatment of African American citizens, espe- cially in major cities. Campuses across the country focus on sexual assaults, suggesting the existence of a rape-culture in some places. Political campaigns have turned a spotlight on fears concerning immigrants into the country, especially from areas such as Latin America or Muslim countries—these fears often imply a racist or nativist attitude. Religious discrimination has also become more prominent, especially in regard to people of Islamic Faith.
Image of page 2
Image of page 3

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 29 pages?

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture