Oscar Wilde and Dorian Gray

Oscar Wilde and Dorian Gray - Now You See It, Now You Don't...

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Now You See It, Now You Don’t Throughout history, it has been human instinct to find alter-egos to satisfy their personal jealousies and secret ambitions. Oscar Wilde, a prominent and controversial writer in the 18 th century, used his own life as an archetype for his writings. His works were full of personal biases, opinions, and ambitions. In both The Picture of Dorian Gray and The Importance of Being Ernest , Wilde utilizes the main characters to portray his own life, in that he lived an alternate identity to satisfy his own wants. Moreover, the characters’ alter-egos jeopardize their true lives by creating conflicts that could have ultimately led to their personal destruction or death. Unfortunately for Wilde, his final years were lived in a cold, dank prison due to the exposure of his true feelings. Nevertheless, Wilde employs his form of “Bunburying” and dual identities to purview his inward desires. Bunburying is pivotal in the structure of Wilde’s play, The Importance of Being Ernest.
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Oscar Wilde and Dorian Gray - Now You See It, Now You Don't...

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