Literary analysis on crime and punishment - Running Head Literary analysis of crime and punishment Student\u2019s Name Instructor Affiliation Date 1 A

Literary analysis on crime and punishment - Running...

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Running Head: Literary analysis of crime and punishment 1 Student’s Name: Instructor Affiliation: Date:
A literary analysis of crime and punishment 2 It is clear that without first accepting the guilt inside, even physical punishment is meaningless. It is only when Raskolnikov confesses his crime that he establishes for himself a path to salvation. This confession leads him to realize that his theory of superiority if widely followed would end in anarchy. He abandons his alienation and is even reconciled with God. Dostoevsky's rhetorical stance for crime is, therefore, that; crime cannot be justified under any circumstance; criminals must be responsible for their behavior and face the underlying consequences. Furthermore, he points out that punishment can be an essential tool in rehabilitating criminals; it is in prison that Raskolnikov abandons his old beliefs and becomes a new man hence awareness of his guilt. Indeed, for punishment to be effective, a criminal must first embrace his guilt (Dostoevsky, 2017, p. 45 ) . The author explains the stance by employing several tools such as tone. T one is an approach that the author takes toward the work's focal topic or subject. We find that soap opera tone has been used, with heaps of prattle, second-and third-hand data, and far-fetched clarifications for abnormal conduct like Raskolnikov's clarification for why Luzhin tries to outline Sonia. It has bunches of minor characters and subplots, a significant number of which

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