Swaddling Clothes: Abigail Spencer - -BCRs for Swaddling Clothes Abigail Spencer 1 Thesis there is an anti-Western sentiment conveyed by the author

Swaddling Clothes: Abigail Spencer - -BCRs for Swaddling...

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-BCRs for Swaddling Clothes: Abigail Spencer 1. Thesis: there is an anti-Western sentiment conveyed by the author through his use of diction, allusion, and/or symbolism. Give five specific textual support for the thesis. a. Mishima epresses anti-western sentiment when Toshiko claims that her husband looks like a "stranger” in his “Western style coat” and “smoking a cigarette” (Mishima 1). Toshiko feels like she cannot relate to her husband at all because of the way he dresses and his attitude. b. Next, the house is described as “unhomely with its Western style furniture” (Mishima 1). Toshiko is unable to feel comfortable in her own home because the furniture feels foreign to her. c. Also, Mishima critiques western culture by including that the husband is an actor (Mishima 1). In Western culture, acting is a respected, highly paid profession. However in eastern culture, it is frowned upon and disgraceful. d. Another anti-western detail is that the husband is driving a nash car and wearing a tweed coat when going to cheat on Toshiko (Mishima 2). He is portrayed negatively throughout the story, so including these details expresses Mishimas hatred for Western culture. e. Finally, Mishima describes the jazz orchestra as braying like a donkey (Mishima 2), therefore humoring that Western music is terrible to listen to. 2. Mishima juxtaposes a number of antithesis, for example East vs West, Wife vs Husband, rich vs poor. What othe r juxtapositions are made? Identify and explain 7 more. Among the 7 juxtapositions, be sure to give at least 2 that are paradoxical? Explain. There is a juxtaposition between the East and the West throughout the story. One example is when she describes her house as “unhomely with its Western-style furniture” (Mishima 1). She doesn’t feel comfortable in her own home because she was raised to prefer Eastern culture, while her husband has an obsession with the West. Then, when Toshiko is leaving in her taki, she says she is “oppressed by the knowledge that their life together was in some way too easy, too painless”(2). This compares the ease of her life with the fact that she feels trapped because of it, and it creates a paradox because she should feel content rather than stuck.

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