DBQ Louisiana Purchase - In the beginning half of the 19th...

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In the beginning half of the 19th century, the United States would grow from what was the original Thirteen Colonies that seceded fortunately from England, to cover the entire extent of the region, from today’s Maine upon California. During this period, several expansionist achievements were done, including The Louisiana Purchase of 1803, the Compromise of 1820, the Mexican cession, the Compromise of 1850, and finally The Kansas-Nebraska Act. All of these and added were gathered between numerous advocates as well as competitors to territorial expansion – all for different reasons. However, each dispute for or facing the expansion ultimately led the United States government’s actions, or absence thereof, and has formed the country as we know that today. Thomas Jefferson from the Democratic-Republican Party made the Louisiana Purchase in 1803. Given the bitter dispute among the Federalists and the Jeffersonians, several Federalists, including Congressmen, continued quite against this acquisition of the massive amount of land from a previous enemy: France. For instance, James Elliot of Vermont says that because “the Constitution is silent on the subject of acquisition of territory the treaty is unconstitutional” (Doc. A). Fascinatingly, the Federalists had always held relaxed writers of the Constitution; Jefferson himself should get over his mindset of strict thought over the notice that the trifling $10 million he had to pay for the large potential land was a large compact. Other

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