PSCI4-30 - Right to Privacy - not specifically mentioned in...

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Right to Privacy - not specifically mentioned in the constitution - a right to privacy is suggested by the 4th ammendment: "the right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated." Supreme Court and Right to Privacy - first clearly specified in 1965 in Griswold v. Connecticut - the court overturned a connecticut statute banning the distribution of birth control devices - the court found the decision to use contraception to be protected by a right of privacy - Roe v. Wade (1973) extended the right of privacy to protect woman's decision to seek an abortion. - 1st trimester, none, 2nd trimester, regulate reasonably access to abortions, 3rd trimeste can limit and prohibit abortions. 2007 ruling upholds ban on partial birth abortions - in gonzales v. carhart, the supreme court upheld the federal partial birth abortion ban act of 2003 - does not overturn roe v. wade, complete ban on one abortion procedure - impact of changed composition of the supreme court
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This note was uploaded on 04/02/2008 for the course PSCI 1060 taught by Professor Hanson during the Spring '08 term at North Texas.

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PSCI4-30 - Right to Privacy - not specifically mentioned in...

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