Summary IBI 7.2.docx - 1 REGENT UNIVERSITY HERMENEUTIC...

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1REGENT UNIVERSITYHERMENEUTIC INTERPRETATION OF PHILIPPIANS 2:12A RESEARCH ASSIGNMENT ON THE EXEGESIS OF PHILIPPIANS 2COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES BYMIN. ALAN T. MARSHALL IIMERIDEN CTDECEMBER 2, 2019
2The book of Philippians is an epistle written by the Apostle Paul that challenges its audience to be selfless, unified, and living examples of Christ. This is evident because Philippians is a letter written to the church of Philippi during a time of persecution and political nationalism. A reader of this letter would be remised to read Paul’s words to the church at face value without grasping the historical, cultural, and political climate of 49-51A.D. Furthermore, inorder to understand the author’s original intention in the text, one must exegetically study the epistle in such a way that dives into the literary strategy, genre, theme, structural design, intent, context, and application of the text. This information is provided by summarizing the “Introduction to Biblical Interpretation Workbook” (IBI) section 7.2.Literary StrategyTo begin a summary of Philippians 2 in the IBI it is important to look at the literary strategy of Paul in writing to the church of Philippi. Philippians is comprised of several essays directed to the church; however, they all hinge on chapter two as the glue to the context that is to be displayed in the overall book. Paul uses verses 12-18 in this chapter to provoke his audience to follow the examples of Jesus, Epaphroditus, and Timothy, but it is in verse 12-18 that Paul challenges his audience to be living examples of righteousness. He states:“12 Therefore, my beloved, as you have always obeyed, not as in my presence only, but now much more in my absence, work out your own salvation with fear and trembling; 13 for it is God who works in you both to will and to do for His good pleasure.14 Do allthings without complaining and disputing, 15 that you may becomeblameless and harmless, children of God without fault in the midst of a crooked and perverse generation, among whom you shine as lights in the world, 16 holding fast the word of life, so that I may rejoice in the day of Christ that I have not run in vain or labored in vain. 17 Yes, and if I am being poured out as a drink offering on the sacrifice and service of your faith, I am glad and rejoice with you all. 18 For the same reason, you also be glad and rejoice with me." (Philippians 2:12-18[New King James Version]).
3Paul purposefully sandwiched the statement in such a way that provided strong examples of faithfulness, integrity, and selflessness before and after he made his challenge to the Philippian church in the verses above. Paul leaves no excuse for righteous living by providing the example of Jesus who is mentioned in Hebrews in this manner “For we do not have a High Priest who cannot sympathize with our weaknesses, but was in all points tempted as we are, yet without sin.” (Hebrews 4:12 [NKJV]). Moreover, Timothy and Epaphroditus were examples provided post verses 12-18 who were faithful servants, whom the Philippian church knew.

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