IV. The Soviet Russia in the 1920s

IV. The Soviet Russia in the 1920s - But Germany was about...

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The Soviet Russia in the 1920s Between the end of 1924 and the end of 1927 Russia was weakened by the conflicting economic and social policies of Stalin and Trotsky following the death of Lenin. At the same time, it faced serious problems in its European policy. A new conservative government in Britain refused to grant credits to a communist state, then arrested British communist party leaders. The negotiations with France over the Russian debt also failed to progress.
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After the Locarno agreement of 1925, the German government appeared to give up its Rapallo policy and to align itself with a western “common front” against Russia. In 1926 France signed an alliance treaty with Romania, ignoring the Russian claim over Bessarabia. Britain broke diplomatic relations with Russia, which was suspicious about an anti-Soviet Polish- Baltic coalition.
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Moscow reacted by trying to reactivate the Rapallo Treaty and make sure that Germany remained “neutral” in case of a war between Russia and the western powers.
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Unformatted text preview: But Germany was about to enter the League of Nations and assume the obligations under art. 16. New German-Russian treaty was signed in 1926. According to that treaty Germany was to remain neutral and not to take part in any sanctions against Russia except if Russia was declared by the League to be the aggressor. Attention Germany refused to choose between East and West, and used its eastern policy as a means of pressuring France and Britain. However, this did not apply to trade relations: in 1927-28, 29% of Russias trade was with Germany and it continued to grow in the period of 1929-30. Russia continued to worry about an eventual coalition of capitalist states and about an anti-Soviet campaign. Stalin, unlike Trotsky, advocated moderation in foreign policy and defeated Trotsky. The latter favoured world revolution while Stalin stressed the doctrine of building som in a single country, Russia....
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This note was uploaded on 08/06/2009 for the course INTERNATIO INT taught by Professor Isikgurleyen during the Spring '09 term at Izmir University of Economics.

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IV. The Soviet Russia in the 1920s - But Germany was about...

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