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casestudy - Case Study: Mutation and Directional Selection...

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Case Study: Mutation and Directional Selection After placing animals from the Caribbean island of Nevis to its sister island of St. Kitts to restore the dwindling population by increasing mates and genetic diversity, it was found that the animals from the two islands did not mate, and were essentially distinct species. The St. Kitts rodent was previously established as Microsciurus edeltus , commonly known as the Edelti Squirrel. The Nevus rodent, which was formerly undiscovered, was named Microscirurus washingtus , commonly known as the Washington Squirrel. The two rodents, although looking very similar, are indeed very different from another. A possible cause for the difference in the two rodents is mutation. Once one squirrel is mutated, all of its offspring will have the same mutations. M. washingtus is probably a mutant species from M. edeltus , changed either by errors in cell division or the mutagen ultraviolet light.
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casestudy - Case Study: Mutation and Directional Selection...

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