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ch116gaslaws - water leaks Our apparatus had leaks but we...

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CH 116-J1 Week of November 17, 2008 Gas Laws 1. Experimental Procedure . a. Set up the constant pressure/gas apparatus, filling it with water and attaching it to an Erlenmeyer flask filled with 20 mL of acetic acid. b. Break up a bicarbonate tablet into three pieces less than 0.5 g. c. Tie a string to a piece of bicarbonate and suspend the tablet above the water in the Erlenmeyer flask. d. Initiate the reaction by tilting the flask and immersing the bicarbonate tablet in the acid. e. As the water level decreases in the apparatus, keep the water levels the same on both sides of the column. f. Measure the change in volume of water in the apparatus to find the volume of CO 2 produced. g. Repeat two more times. 2. Gas Leaks . To establish that there are no leaks in the apparatus system you can put water in it, turn it around, and see if the
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Unformatted text preview: water leaks. Our apparatus had leaks, but we had to use it because it was the only one left to use. 3. Experimental Results . Trial Percent Yield 1 0.022% 2 0.022% 3 0.028% Average: 0.024% Standard Deviation: 0.024 ± 0.00346% Percent Error: -99.78% 4. Wet Sample . If the bicarbonate tablet was exposed to a high humidity atmosphere for several hours, the water in the air would react with the tablet, producing CO 2 and decreasing the mass of the tablet. 5. Partial Pressure of Water . If we ignored the partial pressure of water, the percent bicarbonate would be higher, because the total gas pressure we would see that the bicarbonate tablet gives off would include both the pressure of CO 2 and water. n total = n CO2 vs. n total = n CO2 + n water...
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