Lecture-16 - Lecture 16 - Introduction to Volcanoes...

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1 Lecture 16 - Introduction to Volcanoes Thursday, October 30th, 2008 VOLCANOES What is a volcano? ± A place on the earth’s surface (or any other planet) where molten rock and gases are erupted. ± A hill or mountain built up by the eruption of molten rock. There are, however, many kinds of volcanoes. A volcano does not have to be a beautiful snow- capped conical peak. It can be a hole in the ground, or a crack in the earth’s surface
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2 This is what we tend to think of when we think of volcanoes – beautiful, snow-capped, conical peaks. In this case Mount St. Helens prior to its 1980 eruption. This type of volcano is called a stratovolcano. This is because the cones are built up of layers (strata) of lava and volcanic ash. Here are a couple of other stratovolcanoes. Mount Hood, Cascades Mount Shasta, Cascades (also a composite volcano)
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3 Cinder Cones Cinder cones, Haleakala volcano, Hawaii Ojo de Agua, Mexico These volcanoes are often referred to as monogenetic volcanoes. This is because, unlike stratovolcanoes they usually only erupt once. more cinder cones Surtsey Volcano, Iceland, erupting out of the sea in 1963. Paricutin Volcano, Mexico, erupted out of a corn field in 1943.
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4 Shield Volcanoes Snow-covered Mauna Loa Volcano, Hawaii. The world’s largest volcano, rising 13,690 ft above sea level and 33,000 ft from the ocean floor. The summit crater (or
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Lecture-16 - Lecture 16 - Introduction to Volcanoes...

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