lecture13

lecture13 - EE 42/100 Lecture 13 Jesse Richmond...

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EE 42/100 Lecture 13 Jesse Richmond
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Announcements Homework 5 delayed for today’s lecture, will be posted soon. Will be due next Friday, instead of Wednesday Lab 6 is still being modified. Will be posted as soon as I get it. Midterms are available today and in my office hours Homework 2 graded, scores on bSpace
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Wireless Spectrum – My Apt.
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Transfer Function Transfer function is a function of frequency Complex quantity Both magnitude and phase are function of frequency Two Port filter network V in V out ( 29 ( ) ( ) out out in in V f V H f θ = = - = out in V H V H(f)
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Filters Circuit designed to retain a certain frequency range and discard others Low-pass : pass low frequencies and reject high frequencies High-pass : pass high frequencies and reject low frequencies Band-pass : pass some particular range of frequencies, reject other frequencies outside that band Notch : reject a range of frequencies
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Common Filter TF vs. Freq ( ) H f Frequency High Pass ( ) H f Frequency Low Pass ( ) H f Frequency Band Pass Frequency Band Reject ( ) H f
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Bode Plot Plot of magnitude of transfer function vs. frequency Both x and y scale are in log scale Y scale in dB Log Frequency Scale Decade Ratio of higher to lower frequency = 10 Octave Ratio of higher to lower frequency = 2
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Example Circuit ) 1 ( ) / 1 ) / 1 ( 2 2 C R j A C j R jwC A IN OUT ϖ + = + = V V IN OUT nction TransferFu V V = - + AV T R 2 R 1 + V T V OUT C V IN c R c IN OUT Z Z AZ + = V V A = 100 R 1 = 100,000 Ohms R 2 = 1000 Ohms C = 10 uF
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Example Circuit - + AV T R 2 R 1 + V T V OUT C V IN A = 100 R 1 = 100,000 Ohms R 2 = 1000 Ohms C = 10 uF
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Break Point Values    When dealing with circuits it is convenient to refer to the frequency difference between points at which the power from the circuit is half that at the peak. Such frequencies are known as “half-power
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lecture13 - EE 42/100 Lecture 13 Jesse Richmond...

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