Unit 11 2010 - Unit 11: Bad News Messages Unit 11: Bad News...

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Unit 11: Bad News Messages
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Copyright, Carolyn E. Kerr, 2009 11-2 Unit Table of Contents Unit 11: Bad News Messages . ................................................................................................................. 11-1 Unit Objectives . .................................................................................................................................... 11-3 Selecting Your Approach to Bad News . ................................................................................................ 11-3 The Indirect Organizational Plan for Bad News Messages . ................................................................. 11-4 Types of Buffers . .................................................................................................................................. 11-5 Typical Categories of Bad News Messages . ......................................................................................... 11-6 Bad News Message Checklist . ........................................................................................................... 11-14 It’s Your Turn Practice Activities . .................................................................................................... 11-15 Learning Check Assignment Description . ........................................................................................ 11-16 Unit 11: Bad News Messages
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Copyright, Carolyn E. Kerr, 2009 11-3 Unit Objectives To understand the indirect organizational plan for bad news messages and the elements in that pattern To understand various types of buffers To understand typical categories of bad news messages Selecting Your Approach to Bad News If there is any good news in a discussion of bad news messages it is that it is likely to be the type of message you will need to create least often. Still, as you would expect, these rare messages are ext remely “high stakes” and require a great deal of care and consideration to maintain existing relationships. As was true for persuasive messages, some business communication textbooks suggest that it is appropriate to use the direct organizational plan when writing to superiors. If your audience analysis indicates that’s a possibility, you can certainly use it. And, because the direct organizational plan is easy to use, you simply provide the bad news with whatever details are needed, provide alternatives if you can and close your message, all the while maintaining language that is as positive as possible. For messages to peers, subordinates or those outside the organization you will, as with persuasive messages, use an indirect approach. Unit 11: Bad News Messages
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Copyright, Carolyn E. Kerr, 2009 11-4 The Indirect Organizational Plan for Bad News Messages In Unit 9, you learned how to use the indirect organizational plan for persuasive messages. While you will generally use an indirect organizational plan for bad news messages, the elements in that plan are a bit different. In persuasive messages, you could look to the AIDA approach 34 of Attention, Interest, Desire and Action or the ANSA 35 approach of Attention, Need, Solution, and Action. In bad news messages, the elements are: Buffer Justification Bad News Positive, Goodwill Close possibly including alternatives A “buffer” is simply a neutral way of starting your message. Several types of buffers will be discussed in the next section. Each is designed to set the stage for what is to come. An easy way to think about this is to think about friends who got the “thin letters” when they applied to college. Where your acceptance letter likely started “Congratulations” or “We are pleased to inform you,” their rejection letters probably began with something like “This year, Ol’ State U had an outstanding crop of applicants.” At that point, they knew what was coming. You can practically hear the letter say “unfortunately you weren’t one of them.” The buffer isn’t fooling anyone about what is going on.
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This note was uploaded on 08/14/2009 for the course BUSORG 1101 taught by Professor Neff during the Fall '08 term at Pittsburgh.

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Unit 11 2010 - Unit 11: Bad News Messages Unit 11: Bad News...

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