huckCrucible

huckCrucible - Philip Constantinou Page 1 5/8/05 In the...

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Philip Constantinou Page 1 5/8/05 In the words of the author Logan Smith, “what is important in literature is not what an author says, but what he whispers.” I have to agree with him, because it can be found throughout literature that the message an author wishes to convey is never displayed outright, but is hinted at and communicated indirectly. In the novel, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn , by Mark Twain, and the play, The Crucible , by Arthur Miller, both authors pass a deep thematic idea to the reader through the actions of their characters, rather than the words of the narrator. In The Crucible , behind the obvious theme that people can become advocates of hysteria through religion and hidden hatred for one another, there lies the belief that hardship can strengthen people’s values and pride. The reader understands, through the narration of a third person, who gives us a clear untainted understanding of what is happening, that John Proctor is a troubled man and cannot forgive himself for his lechery with Abigail Williams. Faced with the prospect that his wife may burn as a witch, he confesses his crime to the court to prove that Abigail was a harlot and should not be believed. In the end, however, he is charged with witchcraft, and has a choice to sign a
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huckCrucible - Philip Constantinou Page 1 5/8/05 In the...

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