chem 211 10 notes - Acids and bases Nature of acids and...

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Acids and bases Nature of acids and bases Bronsted-lowry acids and bases Acid is prton doner Base is proton acceptor Proton usually refers to hydrogen ion, H+ A substance may be classified as an acid in presence of a base, it can only at as an acid if the base is able to accept its protons Proton transfer reaction: molecule becomes deprotonanted Ions can also act as an acid A strong acid/base is fully deprotonated in a solution A weak acid/base is only partially deprotonated Conjugate acids is what is left when a base accepts a proton Conjugate base is what is left when an acid donantes a proton Lewis acids and bases Lewis acid is an electron pair acceptor Lewis base is an electron pair donor Every lewis base is a bronsted base, but not every lewis acid is a Bronsted acid Lewis acids do not contain a hydrogen atom A prton is a lewis acid that attaches to a lone pair provided by a lewis base Acidic, basic and amphoteric oxides Acidic oxides reacts w/ water to form bronsted acid Molecular compounds Typically non metals Basic oxide reacts w/ water to form bronsted base Ionic compounds Typically metals Metalloids have both basic and acidic characteristics: amphoteric Proton exchange between water molecules Same substance can function as both an acid and a base In autoprotolysis, one molecule transfers a proton to another molecule of the same kind Maintaining equilibrium Ph Scale pH = -log[H3O+] pH of pure water is 7, pH of acidic solution is <7 pH of basic solution is >7 pOH of solutions pOH= - log[OH-]
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chem 211 10 notes - Acids and bases Nature of acids and...

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