PHY213_Chapter24_Sec1to3

PHY213_Chapter24_Sec1to3 - Chapter 24 Wave Optics...

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Chapter 24 Wave Optics
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General Physics Interference Sections 1 – 3
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General Physics Wave Optics The wave nature of light explains various phenomena Interference Diffraction Polarization
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General Physics Interference Light waves interfere with each other much like water waves do All interference associated with light waves arises when the electromagnetic fields that constitute the individual waves combine
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General Physics Conditions for Interference For sustained interference between two sources of light to be observed, there are two conditions which must be met The sources must be coherent They must maintain a constant phase with respect to each other The waves must have identical wavelengths
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General Physics Producing Coherent Sources Light from a monochromatic (single wavelength) source is allowed to pass through a narrow slit, S o The light from the single slit is allowed to fall on a screen containing two narrow slits, S 1 and S 2 The first slit is needed to insure the light comes from a tiny region of the source which is coherent The waves emerging from the second screen originate from the same wave front and therefore are always in phase
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General Physics Producing Coherent Sources Currently, it is common to use a laser as a coherent source The laser produces an intense, coherent, monochromatic beam over a width of several millimeters The laser light can be used to illuminate multiple slits directly
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This note was uploaded on 08/25/2009 for the course PHY 213 taught by Professor Cao during the Summer '08 term at Kentucky.

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PHY213_Chapter24_Sec1to3 - Chapter 24 Wave Optics...

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