PHY213_Chapter26_Sec5to7

PHY213_Chapter26_Sec5to7 - Chapter 26 Relativity Relativity...

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Chapter 26 Relativity
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General Physics Relativity II Sections 5–7
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General Physics Relativistic Definitions To properly describe the motion of particles within special relativity, Newton’s laws of motion and the definitions of momentum and energy need to be generalized These generalized definitions reduce to the classical ones when the speed is much less than c
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General Physics Relativistic Momentum To account for conservation of momentum in all inertial frames, the definition must be modified v is the speed of the particle, m is its mass as measured by an observer at rest with respect to the mass When v << c, the denominator approaches 1 and so p approaches mv 22 1 mv p mv vc γ ≡=
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General Physics Relativistic Corrections Remember, relativistic corrections are needed because no material objects can travel faster than the speed of light
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General Physics Relativistic Energy The definition of kinetic energy requires modification in relativistic mechanics KE = γ mc 2 – mc 2 The term mc 2 is called the rest energy of the object and is independent of its speed The term γ mc 2 depends on its speed ( γ ) and its rest energy (mc 2 ) The total energy in relativistic mechanics is E = KE + mc 2 A particle has energy by virtue of its mass alone A stationary particle with zero kinetic energy has an energy proportional to its inertial mass The mass of a particle may be completely convertible to energy and pure energy may be converted to particles according to E = mc 2
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General
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This note was uploaded on 08/25/2009 for the course PHY 213 taught by Professor Cao during the Summer '08 term at Kentucky.

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PHY213_Chapter26_Sec5to7 - Chapter 26 Relativity Relativity...

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