masacre of el mozate

masacre of el mozate - March 4 1992 Volume No IV Issue No 2...

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March 4, 1992 Volume No. IV, Issue No. 2 EL SALVADOR THE MASSACRE AT EL MOZOTE: THE NEED TO REMEMBER Introduction With the negotiated cease-fire agreement signed on January 16, 1992, in Mexico City, the twelve-year-old conflict in El Salvador has formally come to an end. The agreements under United Nations supervision between the Salvadoran government and the Farabundo Mart& National Liberation Front ( FMLN ) envision unprecedented reforms: to reduce the military, dissolve the elite, immediate- reaction battalions, eliminate two of the security forces, create a new National Civil Police, and demobilize the FMLN and fully integrate ex-guerrillas into civilian life. These transformations hold forth the greatest possibility yet for the respect for human rights and the achievement of social justice in El Salvador. Two provisions of the peace agreement touch more directly on the question of human rights. In April 1991, the negotiating parties agreed to the formation of a Commission on Truth, which would review "grave acts of violence which have occurred since 1980 and whose mark on society demands with great urgency public knowledge of the truth." In September 1991, the Salvadoran government and the FMLN agreed to a process of "purification" of the armed forces, to be carried out by an ad hoc Commission, which would review the records of military officers with a special focus on their human rights records. Both Commissions have been named, and will begin their work in 1992. 1 1 The members of the Truth Commission are Belisario Betancur, former president of Colombia, Reinaldo Figueredo, former foreign minister of Venezuela, and Thomas Buergenthal, professor of law and president of the Inter-American Introduction. ................................................. 1 The Massacre of El Mozote . ....................... 3 The Massacre Becomes Known. ................ 5 The Lack of Press Coverage in El Salvador. ....................................... 5 U.S. Press Accounts of the Massacre. .6 The Reagan Administration Response. ....7 Congressional Hearings . ...................... 9 The Atlacatl Battalion and U.S. Policy . ..11 U.S. Government Response to Massacres . .................................. 15 The "Official Story". ............................. 16 The Current Status of the Case. ............... 16
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News From Americas Watch - page 2 - Vol. IV, No. 2 Institute for Human Rights in Costa Rica. The members of the ad hoc Commission are Abraham Rodr&guez, Eduardo Molina, and Reynaldo Galindo Pohl.
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News From Americas Watch - page 3 - Vol. IV, No. 2 The formation of both the Truth Commission and the ad hoc Commission represents an acknowledgment that, just as human rights abuses helped give rise to the conflict, a lasting peace must be founded on respect for human rights. Members of political parties who met in January 1992 to discuss an amnesty law were mindful of the need to preserve some accountability for human rights abuses. The Law of National Reconciliation passed by the
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masacre of el mozate - March 4 1992 Volume No IV Issue No 2...

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