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MET_309_Lecture__12_11_28_06

MET_309_Lecture__12_11_28_06 - MET 309 Nondestructive...

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MET 309 Nondestructive Testing  & Quality Assurance Lecture #12 (Radiographic Inspection & Test #3 Review) November 28 th  2006 Notes taken directly from: Nondestructive Testing for Aircraft.   by: Douglas C. Latia ISBN# 0-89100-415-7 & www.NDT-ED.org
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Chapter #6 Radiographic Insp.  X-rays were discovered in 1895 by Wilhelm  Conrad Roentgen. Professor at Wuerzburg University in Germany.  Cathode ray tube In many ways, radiography has changed little  from the early days of its use.  We still capture a shadow image on film using similar  procedures and processes technicians were using in  the late 1800's. The use of X-ray for inspection came about in the  1920’s. Inspection of heavy castings. 
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Radiographic Inspection  The need for increased reliability in aircraft parts  and assemblies contributed greatly to the  refinement of this technique during WWII. Since then, the images have increased in  resolution and electronic recording devices have  been made. Radiographic inspection of a structure is  recommended if the suspected structural area is  hidden or not easily accessible.
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Principles of Radiography  X-rays and gamma rays are very short  wavelength electromagnetic radiation which have  the ability to penetrate material opaque to visible  light. The radiation passes through the material. The radiation is absorbed or attenuated to varying  degrees which is dependent on the: Material Thickness Density Atomic Number Absorption of the radiation is used to render  information that is recorded on a film.
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Principles of Radiography  Radiation is passed through the object being  inspected and produces an invisible image on the  film. The film must be processed in order to produce a  radiograph. A radiograph is a shadow picture of an object very  similar to a black and white negative. More radiation passes through the thin sections of  the object. The more radiation on the film, the darker the  radiograph image. The radiograph can be interpreted using a master  guide.
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Radiography Limitations Radiation travels in straight lines and must intercept  the film at a right angle.
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