Topic 1.3 - Plant Physiology Online Plant Tissue Systems...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Plant Physiology Online: Plant Tissue Systems: Dermal, Ground, and Vascular http://4e.plantphys.net/article.php?ch=1&id=19[8/28/2009 8:24:04 AM] A Companion to Plant Physiology, Fourth Edition by Lincoln Taiz and Eduardo Zeiger Topics Essays Study Questions Readings Help Select Chapter: Search HOME :: CHAPTER 1 :: Topic 1.3 PREVIOUS :: NEXT Topic 1.3 Plant Tissue Systems: Dermal, Ground, and Vascular Dermal tissue. The epidermis is the dermal tissue of young plants undergoing primary growth (see textbook Figure 1.3). It is generally composed of specialized, flattened polygonal cells that occur on all plant surfaces. Shoot surfaces are usually coated with a waxy cuticle to prevent water loss and are often covered with hairs, or trichomes, which are epidermal cell extensions. Pairs of specialized epidermal cells, the guard cells , are found surrounding microscopic pores in all leaves (see textbook Figure 1.3A). The guard cells and pores are called stomata (singular stoma), and they permit gas exchange (water loss, CO 2 uptake, and O 2 release or uptake) between the atmosphere and the interior of the leaf. The root epidermis is adapted for absorption of water and minerals, and its outer wall surface typically does not have a waxy cuticle. Extensions from the root epidermal cells, the root hairs , increase the surface area over which absorption can take place (see textbook Figure 1.3C). Ground tissue. Making up the bulk of the plant are cells termed the ground tissue. There are three types of ground tissue: parenchyma, collenchyma, and sclerenchyma. Parenchyma , the most abundant ground tissue, consists of thin-walled, metabolically active cells that carry out a variety of functions in the plant including photosynthesis and storage (see textbook Figure 1.3B) Collenchyma
Image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern