Chapter 15

Chapter 15 - Chapter 15 summary NOTES

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Plant Physiology Online: Terminology for Polysaccharide Chemistry A Companion to Plant Physiology, Fourth Edition by Lincoln Taiz and Eduardo Zeiger Topics Essays Study Questions Readings Help Select Chapter: Search HOME :: CHAPTER 15 :: Topic 15.1 PREVIOUS :: NEXT Topic 15.1 Terminology for Polysaccharide Chemistry Polysaccharides are named after the principal sugars they contain. For example, a glucan is a polymer made up of glucose; a xylan is a polymer made up of xylose; a galactan is a polymer made up of galactose. For branched polysaccharides, the backbone of the polysaccharide is usually given by the last part of the name. Thus, xyloglucan has a glucan backbone (a linear chain of glucose residues) with xylose sugars attached to it in the side chains; arabinoxylan has a xylan backbone (made up of xylose subunits) with arabinose side chains. However, a compound name does not necessarily imply a branched structure. For example, "glucomannan" is the name given to a polymer containing both glucose and mannose in its
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This note was uploaded on 08/28/2009 for the course BIO 430 taught by Professor Dr.cohen during the Fall '09 term at Kentucky.

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Chapter 15 - Chapter 15 summary NOTES

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