Biology Chapter 35 Objectives

Biology Chapter 35 Objectives - Chapter 35: Plant...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chapter 35: Plant Structure, Growth, and Development The Plant Body 1.Roots, pt in the soil that usually absorbs minerals and water and often stores organic nutrients, they also help anchor the plant to the ground; stems, organs consisting of an alternating system of nodes and internodes, that support the leaves and reproductive structures; leaves are the main photosynthetic organ of the plant. 2.Roots absorb minerals and water and often store organic nutrients, they also help anchor the plant to the ground; fibrous roots- a mat of generally thin roots spreading out below the soil surface; taproots- one large vertical root that produces many smaller branch roots; root hairs- tiny extensions of a root epidermal cell growing behind the root tip and increasing surface area for absorption of water and minerals; adventitious roots- roots that grow from atypical locations, such ads the stem. 3.Stems consist of an alternating system of nodes and internodes, also has an axillary and terminal buds. 4.Apical dominance is the concentration of growth at the tip of the plant shoot, where a terminal bud partially inhibits and axillary bud growth. 5.Stolons- horizontal stems that grow along the surface, allow the plant to reproduce asexually; bulbs- vertical underground shoots consisting mostly of enlarged bases of leaves that store food; tubers- enlarged ends of rhizomes specialized for storing food; rhizomes- a horizontal stem that grows just below the surface of emerges and grows along the surface. 6.Monocots have parallel major veins that run the length of the leaf blade; eucots generally have a multibranced network of major veins. 7.The three kinds of tissues that make up a plant’s organs are dermal tissue, vascular tissue and ground tissue. Dermal tissue is the outer protective covering which forms the first line of defense against physical damage and pathogenic organisms. In non- woody plants, it usually consists of a single layer of tightly packed cells called the epidermis. In woody plants protective tissues called periderm replace the epidermis in older regions of stems and roots. Vascular tissue carries out long-distance transport of materials between roots and shoots. The two types of tissue are xylem and phloem. Xylem conveys water and dissolved minerals upward from roots into the shoot. Phloem transports organic nutrients such as sugars from where they are made to where they are needed. The vascular tissue of a root or stem is called stele. In angiosperms, the stele of roots can be in a solid central vascular cylinder. The stele of stems and leaves are divided into vascular bundles, strands consisting of xylem and phloem. Ground tissue is anything that is not dermal or vascular. Ground tissue that is internal to the vascular tissue is called pith. Ground tissue external to the vascular tissue is called cortex. It includes various cells specialized for functions such as storage, photosynthesis and support. 8.Three basic cell types are parenchyma cell, collenchyma cells, and sclerenchyma cells.
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 4

Biology Chapter 35 Objectives - Chapter 35: Plant...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online