NOTES_SECTION_FOUR

NOTES_SECTION_FOUR - 1 NOTES SECTION FOUR Slide 1 The...

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NOTES SECTION FOUR: Slide 1: The Letter to the Romans belongs to the so-called epistolary genre. Thus in order to exegete properly this letter one must recognize the features of this genre. In this lesson you will learn some methodologies which will help you in interpreting Romans. One way for you to put this into practice is by writing your research paper. Slide 2-3: We have to bring the Letter to the Romans out of the first-century Mediterranean culture into the twenty-first century Western culture in which application must be made. That is quite a gap. We deal both with chronological and geographical distances between which we must build a bridge of understanding. Slide 4: One of the main differences between the two “worlds” lies in how people view their world and their role therein. In our western world we tend to be individualistic—we view the world from an individual perspective. In the first-century Mediterranean world, the people had dyadic personalities—one’s perspective on self was derived from a common group identity. Go to the external link named Dyadic Personalities and view the six slides. Slide 5: In order to understand the social (read cultural) background to the Letter of the Romans, some concepts are helpful to understand. Honor and shame dynamics are a key concept in understanding first-century Mediterranean culture. This will help you for example to understand Rom 1:16. Read the external link named Honor and Shame. Another key concept revolves around patron and client relationships. This will help you better understand some key verses concerning relationships in Romans as well. Read the external link named Patron and Client. Another set of ideas includes deviance and legitimation theories. By pointing to those “outside the group” (read outside the Christian community) as “other,” in the case of Romans as Gentiles or carnal individuals, those inside the group substantiate their own believes. This substantiation is also referred to as legitimation, validating the group’s existence. Understanding the structure and social hierarchy within the culture and the Christian
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NOTES_SECTION_FOUR - 1 NOTES SECTION FOUR Slide 1 The...

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