NOTES_SECTION_THIRTEEN

NOTES_SECTION_THIRTEEN - 1 NOTES SECTION THIRTEEN: Slide 6:...

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NOTES SECTION THIRTEEN: Slide 6: At times, people get so used to viewing Romans as a theology book that they tend to forget it is an epistle, a letter. Thus, like in most of the other letters of Paul the end contains greetings. Slide 7: Phoebe most likely was a Gentile-Christian woman. As F. F. Bruce mentions, “diakonon” can serve either a male or a female. This appears to be the first recorded deacon in church history. Prostatis truly means patron (Word Biblical Commentary, 888). Yet this word is translated as helper by most versions (such as NIV). A patron was an influential person. Phoebe was also a deacon in the nearby church at Cenchreae. She had business in Rome. Some scholars have suggested that she might have had to go to Rome for a lawsuit. Paul probably knew that she was about to travel and took the opportunity to write the letter with the commendation of Phoebe attached so she could pick it up and carry it with her (such commendations were customary). Slide 8-10:
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NOTES_SECTION_THIRTEEN - 1 NOTES SECTION THIRTEEN: Slide 6:...

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