Endg 105 3.1 Sections

Endg 105 3.1 Sections - ENDG 105 Spring 2009 Class 3.1...

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ENDG 105 Spring 2009 Class 3.1 February 2, 2009 Section Views
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RAT 3.1 Individually answer the following questions. There are six (6) types of sectional views, list four (4).
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RAT 3.1 - Answer 1. Full Section 2. Half Section 3. Offset Section 4. Revolved Section 5. Removed Section 6. Brokenout Section
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Learning Objectives List and recognize by name; symbol; and ANSI number these materials: - Cast Iron - Aluminum - Brass, Bronze, - Steel - Zinc or Copper Identify a drawing as being a: - Full Section - Offset Section - Revolved Section - Half Section - Broken-Out Section - Removed Section Given an orthographic view; draw section views: - In Pencil or - In AutoCAD Use revolutions and partial views (as conventional practices) to construct sectional views of an object. List the parts of a drawing which do not get crosshatched, even if the cutting plane passes through them. Sketch a cutting plane for any of the sections listed above
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Purpose of Sections Show internal detail Replace complex orthographic views Describe materials in an assembly Depict assembly of parts
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Cutting Plane The sight arrows at the end of the cutting plane are always perpendicular to the cutting plane. Line thickness of the cutting plane is the same as the visible object line. The direction of the arrow is your line of sight.
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Sectioning Practices Different parts at different angles Hatch spacing of about 1/16”-1/8” Cutting plane line .020” wide (bold) Section or hatch lines -- thin .007” Visible lines -- wide .015” Not parallel or perpendicular to boundary
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When sectioning an assembly of several parts, draw section lines at varying angles to distinguish separate parts.
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