ch_12stu

ch_12stu - Discourse Analysis Discourse Analysis How do we...

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Discourse Analysis
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Discourse Analysis How do we make sense of texts that we read? How do we understand what speakers mean despite what they say? (how do we interpret ambiguous or unclear statements embedded within texts or conversations?) What makes us think that one text is coherent or connected while another is incoherent or jumbled?
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Discourse Analysis Discourse analysis deals with larger chunks of language like conversations and texts (multiple sentences on the same topic). Some linguists apply the principles of syntactic theory to describe the structure of narratives. Some focus more on the pragmatic
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Discourse analysis The study of connected text or units of language above the level of the sentence and the utterances of which they are composed.
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Discourse analysis “Trains collide, two die.” “No shoes, no shirt, no service” Our ability to make sense out of statements and texts that leave a lot unsaid or contain many errors stands out the most about our use of discourse. Paragraph p125 – person learning English Unconventional usage of English and lots of errors, but we understand the message. This chapter talks about how we do that.
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Cohesion Cohesion: ties and connections that exist within a text. It is what helps hold a text together so that it makes sense. Paragraph p125
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Paragraph from page 125 My father once bought a Lincoln convertible. He did it by saving every penny he could. That car would be worth a fortune nowadays. However, he sold it to help pay for my college education. Sometimes I think I’d rather have the convertible.
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Paragraph from page 125 Look for connections (cohesive links) between the sentences in paragraph about Lincoln convertible, p125 one connection is anaphora. The theme of the story is a Lincoln convertible (stated in the first sentence). In other sentences, Pros or shortened NPs are used to refer to the convertible – “that car”, “it”, “the convertible” = lexical connections. The syntactic relationship between the NPs and the Pros and their antecedent helps to tie the sentences together into a unit. Other examples: Theme of the convertible (all sentences are about it). Money terms share meaning (bought, saving, penny, sold, etc…) Time line of events (once, nowadays, sometimes).
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Paragraph from page 126 My father bought a Lincoln convertible. The car driven by the police was red. That color doesn’t suit her. She consists of three letters. However, a letter isn’t as fast as a telephone call.
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But, cohesive ties alone are not enough to make a text sensible. This passage contains a lot of connections between its component sentences, (car- Lincoln, red- color, her- she, letters (alphabet)- letters (mail) but it doesn’t make sense. The reader needs more than just connections
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ch_12stu - Discourse Analysis Discourse Analysis How do we...

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