Ch 5 outline - Chapter 5 outline: I. The Elasticity of...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chapter 5 outline: I. The Elasticity of Demand A. Definition of  elasticity : a measure of the responsiveness of quantity  demanded or quantity supplied to one of its determinants . B. The Price Elasticity of Demand and Its Determinants 1. Definition of  price elasticity of demand : a  measure of how much the quantity  demanded of a good responds to a change in  the price of that good, computed as the  percentage change in quantity demanded  divided by the percentage change in price . 2. Determinants of Price Elasticity of Demand a. Availability of Close Substitutes: the more substitutes a good  has, the more elastic its demand. b. Necessities versus Luxuries: necessities are more price inelastic. c. Definition of the market: narrowly defined markets (ice cream)  have more elastic demand than broadly defined markets (food). d. Time Horizon: goods tend to have more elastic demand over  longer time horizons. C. Computing the Price Elasticity of Demand 1. Formula 2. Example: the price of ice cream rises by 10% and quantity demanded  falls by 20%. Price elasticity of demand = (20%)/(10%) = 2 Price elasticity of demand  =   % change in quantity demanded % change in price
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
3. Because there is an inverse relationship  between price and quantity demanded (the price  of ice cream rose by 10% and the quantity  demanded fell by 20%), the price elasticity of  demand is sometimes reported as a negative  number.  We will ignore the minus sign and  concentrate on the absolute value of the  elasticity. D. The Midpoint Method:  A Better Way to Calculate Percentage Changes and  Elasticities 1. Because we use percentage changes in calculating the price elasticity of  demand, the elasticity calculated by going from point A to point B on a  demand curve will be different than an elasticity calculated by going from  point B to point A. a. A way around this is called the  midpoint method. b. Using the midpoint method  involves calculating the  percentage change in either  price or quantity demanded by  dividing the change in the  variable by the midpoint  between the initial and final  levels rather than by the initial  level itself. c. Example: the price rises from $4  to $6 and quantity demanded  falls from 120 to 80. % change in price = (6 - 4)/5 × 100% = 40% % change in quantity demanded = (120-80)/100 = 40% price elasticity of demand = 40/40 = 1 P r i c e   e l a s t i c i t y   o f   d e m a n d   =   ( Q - Q ) / [ ( Q + Q ) / 2 ] ( P - P ) / [ ( P + P ) / 2 ] 2 1 1 2 2 1 1 2
Background image of page 2
E. The Variety of Demand Curves 1. Classification of Elasticity a. When the elasticity is greater than one, the demand is  considered to be elastic.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 08/31/2009 for the course EC 350 taught by Professor Sekelj during the Spring '08 term at Clarkson University .

Page1 / 12

Ch 5 outline - Chapter 5 outline: I. The Elasticity of...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online