Ch 9 outline - Chapter 9 outline I The Determinants of...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chapter 9 outline: I. The Determinants of Trade A. Example used throughout the chapter: the market for steel in a country called  Isoland. B. The Equilibrium Without Trade 1. If there is no trade, the domestic price in the steel market will balance  supply and demand. 2. A new leader is elected who is interested in pursuing trade.  A committee  of economists is organized to determine the following: a. If the government allows trade, what will happen to the price of  steel and the quantity of steel sold in the domestic market? b. Who will gain from trade, who will lose, and will the gains exceed  the losses? c. Should some sort of import restriction be put in place in the  market for steel? C. The World Price and Comparative Advantage
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
1. The first issue is to decide whether Isoland should import or export steel. a. The answer depends on the relative price of steel in Isoland  compared with the price of steel in other countries. b. Definition of  world price : the price of a good that prevails in  the world market for that good. 2. If the world price is greater than the domestic price, Isoland should  export steel; if the world price is lower than the domestic price, Isoland  should import steel. a. Note that the domestic price represents the opportunity cost of  producing steel in Isoland, while the world price represents the  opportunity cost of producing steel abroad. b. Thus, if the domestic price is low, this implies that the opportunity  cost of producing steel in Isoland is low, suggesting that Isoland  has a comparative advantage in the production of steel.  If the  domestic price is high, the opposite is true. II. The Winners and Losers from Trade A. We can use welfare analysis to determine who will gain and who will lose if free  trade begins in Isoland. B. We will assume that, because Isoland would be such a small part of the market  for steel, they will be price takers in the world economy.  This implies that they  take the world price as given and must sell (or buy) at that price. C. The Gains and Losses of an Exporting Country 1. If the world price is higher than the domestic price, Isoland will export  steel.  Once free trade begins, the domestic price will rise to the world  price. 2. As the price of steel rises, the domestic quantity of steel demanded will  fall and the domestic quantity of steel supplied will rise.  Thus, with trade,  the domestic quantity demanded will not be equal to the domestic  quantity supplied.
Background image of page 2
3. Welfare Before Trade a. Consumer surplus is equal to: A + B. b.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 08/31/2009 for the course EC 350 taught by Professor Sekelj during the Spring '08 term at Clarkson University .

Page1 / 10

Ch 9 outline - Chapter 9 outline I The Determinants of...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online