MaterialsBalance

MaterialsBalance - 1 What comes out must come go back in:...

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Materials Balance: An introduction. Edward Morey, January 20, 2008 1 What comes out must come go back in: materials balance and the environment Revised January 20, 2009 Lecture on Materials Balance -E.R.Morey -.wav file of a past lecture Analysis of Environmental Pollution, Alan Kneese, Swedish Journal of Economics , 1971 - this article is a classic Earth as a space ship, Kenneth Boulding, 1965 for other stuff by Boulding see http://www.colorado.edu/econ/Kenneth.Boulding/ Ken Boulder was a great economist and a member of this Department. He retired the year before I arrived at CU. He died a few years ago. Pearce and Turner Chapter 2: The Circular Economy –David Pearce was a leader at the interface of environmental economics and ecology. He died recently, went to the hospital feeling sick and died a few hours later. I have added my comments to the readings as pdf notes
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Materials Balance: An introduction. Edward Morey, January 20, 2008 2 Environmental economists have a way of thinking about the world that extends the way most other economists think about the world For your essay topics, ask yourself whether materials balance is relevant. We think of (Production and consumption) And (Emissions, waste, and pollution) as two sides of the same coin – what goes in must come out. The total amount (weight) of what goes in must equal the total weight of what comes out. This is why it is called Materials Balance : in the long-run the environmental teeter-totter must balance. This is because, with the exception of nuclear reactions, matter is neither created nor destroyed.1 1 The same is true of energy. Google the First Law of Thermodynamics. . (We need to learn a bit about the First and Second Laws of Thermodynamics.) And, If it doesn’t come out in one form it must come out in some other form. Nothing is lost: production and consumption just change the form of things. Everything that is produced and consumed has it origins in the environment. Think trees, plants, water, air, minerals. I think of production as simply a rearranging of stuff.
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Materials Balance: An introduction. Edward Morey, January 20, 2008 3 Energy is what drives the rearrangement. Factories take inputs, rearranging them to produce an array of commodities. Some of these commodities are valued by consumers, or other producers, so can be sold for a positive price. Producing these “market” commodities is why the firm is in business. But other less desirable commodities are produced as well. The other commodities produced are called emissions , or more precisely, non-market emissions – one could think of goods as one type of emissions, the good type. The total weight of the inputs used by the producer must equal the total weight of the market goods and other emissions generated by the production process. I don’t know this for sure, but I suspect that in many production processes, the weight of the other
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MaterialsBalance - 1 What comes out must come go back in:...

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