{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

Chapter17-S09(2) - Chapter 17 Sound Waves Sound waves are...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–5. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chapter 17 Sound Waves Sound waves are the most important examples of longitudinal waves . As the waves travel, the particles in the medium vibrate to produce changes in density and pressure along the direction of motion of the wave. Sound waves are divided into three categories: (1) Audible waves are waves that lie within the range of sensitivity of the human ear (20 ~ 20,000 Hz). (2) Infrasonic waves are waves having frequencies below the audible range. Sources of infrasonic waves include earthquakes, thunder, volcanoes, and wave produced by vibrating heavy machinery. (3) Ultrasonic waves (do not confuse with supersonic, which is used for an object moving faster than sound) are waves having frequencies above the audible range. Many animals like dogs and bats can hear ultrasonic frequencies.
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
17.1 Speed of Sound Waves ρ B v = Production of a longitudinal pulse through a compressible gas by a moving piston. ρ : medium density B : bulk modulus ( 29 C T v o C 273 1 m/s 331 + = For sound traveling through air, the relationship between wave speed and medium temperature is
Background image of page 2
v solids  >  v liquids  v gases
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
17.2 Periodic Sound Waves
Background image of page 4
Image of page 5
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}