Lecture 4 - Lecture 4 Developmental Biology Reading from...

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Lecture 4 Developmental Biology March 11, 2007 Reading from textbook (p
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Fig. 2.8 The sequential expression of different sets of genes establishes the body plan along the antero- posterior axis
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Patterning the vertebrate body plan: axes and germ layer (I)
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“It is not birth, marriage, or death, but gastrulation , which is truly the most important time in your life” --Lewis Wopert (1986) “For it was you who formed my inward parts; you knit me together in my mother's womb. I praise you, for I am fearfully and wonderfully made.” --King David from Psalm 139: 13,14
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Fig. 3.1 The skeleton of a mouse embryo illustrates the vertebrate body plan
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Fig. 3.2 Vertebrate embyos show considerable differences in form before gastrulation but subsequently all go through a stage at which they look similar
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Fig. 3.18 Scanning electron micrograph of chick early somites and neural tube
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Scanning electron micrograph showing neural tube and somites L
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Fig. 3.8 The early tailbud L stage (stage 26) of a Xenopus embryo
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Fig. 3.3 Life cycle of the African claw-toed frog Xenopus lavis
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Fig. 3.5 Cleavage L of the Xenopus embryo Fig. 3.4 A late-stage Xenopus oocyte L
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Fig. 3.6 Gastrulation in amphibians L L L L L L L L L
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Fig. 3.7 Neurulation D in amphibians
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Neurulation Neurulation is one of the most dramatic processes of organogenesis, resulting in the formation of neural tube which becomes brain and the spinal cord a . Once neural tube has formed, the basic vertebrate body plan is evident, and all vertebrate embryos look similar at this stage Neurectoderm --a specialized region within the ectoderm where the neural precursors arise from. First the neurectoderm cells elongate and become columnar;
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Lecture 4 - Lecture 4 Developmental Biology Reading from...

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