{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

Lec-35-Review - Hydrogen Bonds Lecture 35 Exam 3 Review...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Lecture 35 – Exam 3 Review – Concepts to Remember – Chapters 4, 5, 9-11, and 16. Hydrogen Bonds Attraction of hydrogen atom for an electron pair on a small, very electronegative atom Examples include an H-F, H-O, or H-N bond. Hydrogen bonds are stronger than dispersion forces. Bond between hydrogen and any of three elements is quite polar, with hydrogen at the positive end. Energies of bonds: 4-25 kJ/mol . p.413b Double Stranded DNA
Image of page 1

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Fig. 9-29, p.423 Non-superimposable mirror image chiral molecules are enantiomers. - Enantiomers rotate polarized light in different directions. Any molecule containing a carbon with 4 different attached groups is chiral . Most amino acids are chiral. Properties of Gases can be compressed exert pressure on whatever surrounds them expand into whatever volume is available easily diffuse into one another can be described in terms of their temperatures and pressure,the volume occupied, and the amount (number of molecules or moles) present Pressure pressure = force/area force = mass × acceleration 1 Standard Atmosphere = 1 atm 1 atm = 760 mm Hg(exactly) 760 mm Hg(exactly) = 760 torr 760 torr = 101.325 kPa 100 kPa = 1 bar Kinetic Molecular Theory: Gases particles in continuous, random, rapid motion collisions between particles are elastic volume occupied by the particles is negligibly small effect on their behavior attractive forces between particles have a negligible effect on their behavior gases have no fixed volume or shape, take the volume and shape of the container
Image of page 2
Ideal Gas Law V α (n × T)/P V = R × (n × T)/P where R is proportionality constant P × V = n × R × T p.451 How does Kinetic Molecular Theory account for the ideal gas law?
Image of page 3

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern