L12- Behavior, sexual selection,altruism- PRS

L12- Behavior, sexual selection,altruism- PRS - Georgia...

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Biology 1510 Georgia Tech School of Biology Fall 2008 Do you think I’m sexy?
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Biology 1510 Georgia Tech School of Biology Fall 2008 Animal Signals and Communication An action carried out by muscles or glands under control of the nervous system in response to a stimulus What are some examples of behaviors? Behavior is the interface of physiology and the environment Has both innate and learned components
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Biology 1510 Georgia Tech School of Biology Fall 2008 Animal Signals and Communication In behavioral ecology , a signal is a behavior that causes a change in another animal’s behavior Communication is the transmission and reception of signals Animals communicate using visual, chemical, tactile, and auditory signals The type of signal is closely related to lifestyle and environment
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Biology 1510 Georgia Tech School of Biology Fall 2008 Fig. 51-3 Tinbergen noticed his sticklebacks behaving aggressively towards passing trucks. The important characteristic is the red color.
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Biology 1510 Georgia Tech School of Biology Fall 2008 Fig. 51-8 30° Beehive B 30° A C Round dance – food is close Waggle dance – let me draw you a map A Location B Location C Location
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Biology 1510 Georgia Tech School of Biology Fall 2008 Fig. 51-11 Pinecone Nest EXPERIMENT Niko Tinbergen wanted to know how female digger wasps find their nests in sand dunes What was his hypothesis?
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Biology 1510 Georgia Tech School of Biology Fall 2008 Fig. 51-11 Pinecone Nest EXPERIMENT RESULTS Nest No nest Do they use landmarks?
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Biology 1510 Georgia Tech School of Biology Fall 2008 Optimal Foraging Model Optimal foraging model views foraging behavior as a compromise between benefits of nutrition and costs of obtaining food The costs of obtaining food include energy expenditure and the risk of being eaten while foraging Natural selection should favor foraging behavior that minimizes the costs and maximizes the benefits
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Biology 1510 Georgia Tech School of Biology Fall 2008 Optimal foraging behavior is demonstrated by the Northwestern crow A crow will drop a whelk (a mollusc) from a height to break its shell and feed on the soft parts The crow faces a trade-off between the height from which it drops the whelk and the number of times it must drop the whelk
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Biology 1510 Georgia Tech School of Biology Fall 2008 Fig. 51-19 Average number of drops Total flight height Average number of drops 60 50 40 20 10 0 3 5 15 25 50 75 100 125 Total flight height (number of drops × drop height in m) Drop height (m) 2 7 30
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Biology 1510 Georgia Tech School of Biology Fall 2008 Fig. 51-19 Average number of drops Total flight height Drop height preferred by crows = 5.23 m Average number of drops 60 50 40 20 10 0 3 5 15 25 50 75 100 125 Total flight height (number of drops × drop height in m) Drop height (m) 2 7 30
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Biology 1510 Georgia Tech School of Biology Fall 2008 Balancing Risk and Reward Risk of predation affects foraging behavior For example, mule deer are more likely to feed in open forested areas where they are less likely to be killed by mountain lions Many studies have shown that animals will give up opportunities to forage when predation risk is high Do you think this is always the case?
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L12- Behavior, sexual selection,altruism- PRS - Georgia...

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