AP Lang Research Paper

AP Lang Research Paper - Thesis Sarah Palin uses primarily...

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Thesis: Sarah Palin uses primarily emotional appeals to bolster her ideas and to persuade voters to side with her. She also uses this emotion to criticize Barrack Obama’s views and ideals. I. Introduction A. Palin’s comment on lipstick and hockey moms B. Surprised by nomination 1. greatest opportunities come unexpectedly C. Thesis II. Economy and Taxes A. No tax increases 1. Problem 2. Backwards proposal 3. Sister story B. Obama’s Tax Plan 1. Take More 2. “Millions” C. Economy 1. Soccer parent analogy a. common issues 2. Small business analogy a. relating to the people 3. Toxic mess on main street a. housing market III. Energy A. Oil 1. Drill, baby, drill a. help economy in 5 to 10 years 2. Congressional moratorium decision a. “pretty pathetic” 3. Sarcastic comment 4. Reference to Bush’s visit with Saudis a. “that’s nonsense” 5. Money to foreign powers to incite anger IV. Foreign Policy A. Palin’s policies on war 1. Beacon of Light a. Reagan b. spread democracy 2. Government and security 3. Comment about Al-Qaida and Shi’a B. Palin’s policies on foreign powers 1. Israel a. ally 2. Anti-Ahmadinejad a. dangerous
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b. said stinking corpse C. Obama policies on war and negotiations 1. White flag of surrender 2. Travesty to exit now 3. Beyond naïveté a. no preconditions; down right dangerous
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“They say the difference between a hockey mom and a pit bull…lipstick.” (“Lipstick on a Pig”) This memorable comment came from Republican vice presidential candidate Sarah Palin in her acceptance speech on August 29, 2008. Since that speech she has spoken all over the country in hopes of firing up voters to support John McCain and the Republican cause. She and her political advisors have used slogans such as “Read my lipstick” and “You go girl” to establish a unique rapport with Americans. To bolster her ideas and persuade voters to side with her, Palin uses emotional appeals. She also uses an emotional appeal to criticize Barrack Obama’s views and ideals. Palin’s conservative views on taxes gained a boost from her use of emotional appeals. Palin is against higher taxes, especially income taxes and nuisance taxes like the tire tax (“Sarah Palin on Tax Reform”). In fact, during the 2008 vice presidential debate between Joe Biden, the democratic vice presidential candidate, and herself, Palin described levying more taxes was a “backwards proposal” (“Full Vice Presidential Debate”). That sentence made crowds roar in support of the plan. By saying this and criticizing Obama’s plan, Palin was attempting to show that Obama’s tax plan would be ineffective and detrimental to the country. In an effort to emphasize the differences between McCain’s and Obama’s tax plans she used a family reference. In her speech at the Republican National Convention in September 2008, she spoke about her sister and brother-in-law who had opened a service station in Alaska. Palin asked, “How are they going to be any better off if taxes go up?” (“Remarks”). In that same speech, she equated that service station with a small farm in
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Minnesota or a plant in Ohio or Michigan. By using her pathos, Palin brought the
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This note was uploaded on 09/04/2009 for the course AP Language taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '09 term at American Academy of Art.

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AP Lang Research Paper - Thesis Sarah Palin uses primarily...

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