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Lec-32-Chap-05-2 - Cola Drinks Solvent • water Solutes...

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CHE 131 Lecture 31 – Reactions in Aqueous Solutions Chapter 5: pp. 165-185. Oxidation-Reduction Reaction Oxidation –loss of electrons Reduction – gain of electrons Redox reaction oxidizing agent – substance that causes oxidation reducing agent – substance that cause reduction Common Oxidizing and Reducing Agents Fig. 5-8, p.182 Burning of Magnesium in air forming magnesium oxide, a white powder.
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p.182a Fig. 5-9, p.182 p.182b Copper and Nitric Acid
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Copper Oxide and Hydrogen Gas Recognizing Redox Reactions Solution homogeneous mixtures of two or more substances . usually a solution is thought of as a liquid that contains some dissolved substance such as a liquid or a gas. solid solutions – alloys of gold and silver. Solute substance that is present in smallest quantity dissolved substance(s) can be either a gas, a liquid, or a solid one or more present in a solution
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Solvent substance present in largest quantity only one per solution water in aqueous solutions
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Unformatted text preview: Cola Drinks Solvent • water Solutes • carbon dioxide (gas) • sweetener (solid) • phosphoric acid (liquid) • caramel color (solid) Molarity The number of moles of solute per liter of solution. molarity → M moles of solute M = liter of solution units → molar = moles/liter = M p.193 Solution Preparation from Solid Solution Preparation by Dilution Stoichiometric Relationships Fig. 5-18a, p.201 AgBr from Silver nitrate and Potassium bromide Fig. 5-18b, p.201 Addition of Sodium thiosulfate: Solid AgBr dissolves. Titrations EXAMPLE: A sample of lye, sodium hydroxide, is neutralized by sulfuric acid. How many milliliters of 0.200 M H 2 SO 4 are needed to react completely with 25.0 mL of 0.400 M NaOH ? 2 NaOH (aq) + H 2 SO 4(aq) → Na 2 SO 4(aq) + 2 H 2 O Parts per Million #g of solute #mg of solute ppm = × 10 6 = #g of solution #kg of solution #micro-L solute ppm = #Lof solution...
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