Lec-12-Chap-07-3 - CHE 131 Lecture 12, 2/17/2006 0 - E0/16...

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CHE 131 Lecture 12, 2/17/2006 1 Quantum Numbers and Orbitals Lecture twelve (Chapter seven) Benjamin S. Hsiao Department of Chemistry Stony Brook University E 0 -E 0 0 /4 0 /9 0 /16 n = 1 (1) n = 3 (9) n = 4 (16) n = 2 (4) So what do the wave functions look like? The wave functions are three dimensional so they should have 3 quantum numbers. Where are the other two? Since we are dealing with a sphere only the first one involves distance, r, the radius. The others involve angles. E 0 0 0 /4 0 /9 0 /16 n = 1 (1) n = 3 (9) n = 4 (16) n = 2 (4) Number of nodes = (n-1) planar node radial node 1s 2s 2p 1s 2s The wave functions are three dimensional so they should have 3 quantum numbers. Where are the other two? principal quantum number n =1, 2, 3 … azimuthal quantum number: l = 0, 1, 2, … (n-1) The second is the azimuthal quantum number, l . It indexes the shape of the orbital, its angular properties. s orbitals have no angular dependence. Their l value is 0 . But p orbitals have a angular dependence their l value is 1.
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Lec-12-Chap-07-3 - CHE 131 Lecture 12, 2/17/2006 0 - E0/16...

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