Lect_3_evidence

Lect_3_evidence - (b Magnetic mineral grain has cooled to a...

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The world The world s major tectonic plates s major tectonic plates
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Three Types of Plate Boundaries
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Fit of the Continents
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Continental Drift The Supercontinent of Pangaea (200 million years ago)
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Breakup of Pangaea 200 million years ago
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Breakup of Pangaea 140 million years ago
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Breakup of Pangaea 65 million years ago
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Breakup of Pangaea Today
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Distribution of - 300 My old glaciers - 250 My old deserts
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Grooves from Glaciers?
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Earth’s pole of rotation defines climate zones
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Distribution of Fossils Glossopteris Mesosaurus
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Distribution of Fossils
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Continents don’t fit exactly
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New Evidence: Continental Shelf & Geology
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Thermoremnant magnetization (a) Magnetic mineral grain at a temperature above the Curie point (>600˚C). Magnetic domains are randomly oriented with no net magnetization.
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Unformatted text preview: (b) Magnetic mineral grain has cooled to a temperature below the Curie point in the presence of the earth’s magnetic field (blue arrow). Magnetic domains have lined up in the direction of the earth’s field producing a net permanent magnetization in that direction. Dipole Field: Magnetic Field of a Bar Magnet Alternate explanations: fossils Convergent Boundaries Convergent Boundaries Continent-continent Continent-continent convergence in convergence in central Asia central Asia Collision of India with Eurasia Collision of India with Eurasia The collision of India with Eurasia The collision of India with Eurasia – A Continent-Continent collision zone A Continent-Continent collision zone...
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Lect_3_evidence - (b Magnetic mineral grain has cooled to a...

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