Lec17_08BIEB102

Lec17_08BIEB102 - BIEB102 Announcements Final Exam: 10 Dec...

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BIEB102 Announcements Final Exam: 10 Dec (W) at 1130-230 in York 2622 Format similar to previous exams Last part of course - 120 points Second part of course - 50 points First part of course - 30 points For the old material focus on concepts You are unlikely to be tested on specific details of case studies from the first part of the course. All equations that you might need will be provided on the test.
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Geological history, continental drift and diversity Local versus regional contributions to diversity Island biogeography Species-area relationships: different types of islands
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Geological history, continental drift and diversity Diversity has generally increased over the past several hundred million years. Proliferation of flowering plants Proliferation of fish, mollusks Ricklefs Figure 24.1
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Geological history, continental drift and diversity Historical forces have affected the diversification of life in different ways 1) Changing climate and physical conditions 1) Rearrangements of the continents and ocean basins 1) Growth and erosion of mountains 1) Evolution (and immigration) of new predators, parasites and pathogens 1) Catastrophic collisions with asteroids For these reasons, an exclusive focus on local environmental conditions will yield an incomplete understanding of diversity.
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Geological history, continental drift and diversity The positions of the continents have changed over geologic time. 1) Drift has influenced climate (note position of Pangaea with respect to equator). 2) Drift has created and eliminated corridors of dispersal between continents. Ricklefs Figure 24.4
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Geological history, continental drift and diversity Ricklefs Figure 24.5 100 - 50 mya break up and southerly drift of Gondwana 70 mya Bering Sea land bridge 6 mya North America and South America meet
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Geological history, continental drift and diversity Begon, Harper & Townsend (2006)
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Geological history, continental drift and diversity Ricklefs Figure 24.6 History of connections between the continents endures in the distributions of animals and plants. Ratites are descended from a common ancestor that inhabited Gondwanaland before its breakup. All extant ratites are flightless. This is an example of vicariance.
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Geological history, continental drift and diversity Behold the moa! 11 species of moa occupied New Zealand prior to human colonization. The largest species was over 3 m tall and weighed 250 kg. All species are now extinct.
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Geological history, continental drift and diversity
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Geological history, continental drift and diversity
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Biogeographic regions reflect long-term isolation of large areas. Ricklefs
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Lec17_08BIEB102 - BIEB102 Announcements Final Exam: 10 Dec...

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