PR305 - Research and Planning

PR305 - Research and Planning - Defining Problems and...

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Defining Problems and Opportunities: Understanding Public Opinion and Strategic Planning Learning Objectives 1. Understand how research is used to analyze public opinion 2. Understand the types of publics and how goals, objectives, strategies, and tactics are determined by them 3. Understand the campaign-planning process
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Four-Step Public Relations Process
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Model of the PR Function in an Organization
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Four-Step Public Relations Process Strategic Planning Steps and Program Outline
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Four-Step Public Relations Process Strategic Planning Steps and Program Outline (Cont.)
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Mass Opinion and Public Opinion (or the Opinions of Publics) Opinion polls measure mass opinion, not the opinions of publics. The former  is less relevant to the public relations manager than is the latter. The mass  is heterogeneous, and publics are homogeneous. A mass audience consists  of many types of people who typically have nothing more in common than  that they use the same mass media. Publics, on the other hand, consist of  people who are affected by a common problem or opportunity, and they use  the media, and other people, to learn about the issue. Publics behave as a  single group. Masses do not; in fact, masses typically are inactive. Usually,  a mass will consist of many types of publics, but not one so-called “general  public,” which does not exist, because it is a logical impossibility. Mass opinion polls are useful for predicting the outcome of elections,  because masses vote, but they are of little value for segmenting publics  according to specific organizational problems and opportunities, as are  consumer-attitude surveys. 
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This note was uploaded on 09/05/2009 for the course PR Public Rel taught by Professor Meadows during the Spring '09 term at University of Texas at Austin.

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PR305 - Research and Planning - Defining Problems and...

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