lecture4 - CIS 525/725 Computer Networks Lecture 4:...

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CIS 525/725 – Computer Networks Lecture 4: Application Programming Interfaces (APIs) Mitch Neilsen neilsen@cis.ksu.edu
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InterProcess Communication 1. Pipes and FIFOs – data exchange 2. Signals – timeout and event indication Use Signals/Sighandler in C (Ex5.c) Use Timer thread/Callbacks in Java (e.g., http://www.javacoffeebreak.com/articles/network_timeouts/ and http://www.microsoft.com/mind/1197/Java9111197.asp ) Use Timer thread/Callbacks in C++ (e.g., http://msdn2.microsoft.com/en- us/library/system.threading.timer.aspx ) 3. Semaphores – synchronization
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Client-Server Model z The Client-Server Model is a process model that can be used to describe the interaction between cooperating applications (clients and servers). z The client-server paradigm of request-reply pairs is the primary pattern of interaction between cooperating applications, but other paradigms are possible: z collecting information before it is needed (e.g., Usenet News) z broadcasting unsolicited messages (spam)
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Comparison between Clients and Servers z A server usually begins executing before any interaction begins, and usually continues to respond to requests even after a client dies. On the other hand, a client usually terminates after making only a few requests. z A server waits for requests on a well-known port, but a client can use any unused, non- reserved port for its communication.
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z Concurrent server - a server that can handle several requests at the same time. z
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lecture4 - CIS 525/725 Computer Networks Lecture 4:...

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